Recessional

Recessional Set in the Palms a Florida retirement center Recessional follows several residents over the course of a year as their individual narratives humorous moving or sometimes triumphant unfold Chris Mal

  • Title: Recessional
  • Author: James A. Michener
  • ISBN: 9780449223451
  • Page: 403
  • Format: Paperback
  • Set in the Palms, a Florida retirement center, Recessional follows several residents over the course of a year as their individual narratives humorous, moving, or sometimes triumphant unfold Chris Mallory reluctantly relinquishes his driver s license at the age of ninety, but refuses to hang up his dancing shoes The Palm s five self appointed elders, all once outstanSet in the Palms, a Florida retirement center, Recessional follows several residents over the course of a year as their individual narratives humorous, moving, or sometimes triumphant unfold Chris Mallory reluctantly relinquishes his driver s license at the age of ninety, but refuses to hang up his dancing shoes The Palm s five self appointed elders, all once outstanding in their respective careers, hotly debate current affairs and plot a daring flying adventure Laura Oliphant, former head of a private school for girls, never stops learning and never stops educating others, especially about the natural wonders of Florida and Reverend Helen Quade, the Palms s unofficial pastor, finds an unexpected romance We meet, too, the families of some of the Palms s residents among them an independent, unconventional young woman who owes her success to the aunt who encouraged her always to follow her own instincts and the devoted children of one resident who grapple with difficult decisions about their elderly mother s final days When they are confronted with any important question that affects their closely knit community, the Palms residents band together and offer the new director, Andy Zorn, both their support and their suggestions.

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    • Recessional « James A. Michener
      403 James A. Michener
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      Posted by:James A. Michener
      Published :2018-09-20T19:48:32+00:00

    About " James A. Michener "

  • James A. Michener

    James Albert Michener is best known for his sweeping multi generation historical fiction sagas, usually focusing on and titled after a particular geographical region His first novel, Tales of the South Pacific, which inspired the Rodgers and Hammerstein musical South Pacific, won the 1948 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction.Toward the end of his life, he created the Journey Prize, awarded annually for the year s best short story published by an emerging Canadian writer founded an MFA program now, named the Michener Center for Writers, at the University of Texas at Austin and made substantial contributions to the James A Michener Art Museum in Doylestown, Pennsylvania, best known for its permanent collection of Pennsylvania Impressionist paintings and a room containing Michener s own typewriter, books, and various memorabilia.Michener s entry in Who s Who in America says he was born on Feb 3, 1907 But he said in his 1992 memoirs that the circumstances of his birth remained cloudy and he did not know just when he was born or who his parents were.

  • 991 Comments

  • Michener is known for his beautiful writing and his grand historical epics. This, his last novel is very different, written towards the end of his life when obviously there were important things on his mind.Andy Zorn is a young disgraced obstetrician working in Chicago. We meet him as he is packing his bags and heading south. He is despondent after a nasty divorce and the realization that he can no longer afford the increased premiums for his liability insurance,the result of losing two fraudule [...]


  • Why did I ever read James Michener? Or maybe his earlier works were more engaging. I rank this with his "The Drifters", a pathetic attempt by an out-of-touch, ivory-tower, middle-aged author at capturing the spirit of the hippie days.


  • This book was published in 1994. It takes on a number of ethical issues that were relatively new to the country at the time: AIDS, euthanasia, living wills, and elder abuse, among others. Since they are no longer new topics these days, it's hard to decide how I'd have felt about the book if I'd read it then. Now, it seems rather dated. Also dated is Michener's casual use of the word "retarded" ("But only a retarded reader would have failed to understand ", p. 165).But my main complaint with the [...]


  • This is the first Michener book I've ever read, and I really liked it. Reading about the day-to-day life and workings of an assisted living facility was very interesting. I will definitely read other Michener books in the future based on how much I liked this one.


  • Michener examines the assisted living (fka "Nursing Homes") industry through the characters that reside in a Florida facility known as "The Palms." This book was written during the later years of Michener's life and it is apparent that he is not at his best (The Source, Centennial, et al). The characters and situations are contrived. At times, he uses the storyline for his occasional liberal rants. One contradictory character was the clergywoman. She engages the Palms' of a think-tank composed o [...]


  • I have had this book around for many years, yet when I picked it up this week, I sped through it.I love James Mitchener, although in general I have to be in the mood to tackle one of his sweeping tomes. Recessional was different. It is a tighter story than his general sweeping tale of a place (think Tales of the South Pacific or Hawaii). The story of a doctor running from his profession due to lawsuits and high insurance premiums, it becomes a panorama of an upscale Florida retirement community. [...]


  • Sometimes I think Michener wrote these enormous books so he could write essays on modern problems. This is no exception, but it was still an excellent book. The setting is a retirement home near Tampa in 1993. The mostly wealthy residents' discussion of the state of health care could have been plucked from today's conversations. The compassionate treatment of AIDS and Alzheimer's patients and euthanasia were discussed at length. Michener is ambivalent about the morality of euthanasia, but sees l [...]


  • On first glance,even a Michener book on the American health care system,via an expensive 'nursing home'doesn't look like a page turner.However with his skill and peerless research it turns into a very human and involving story.The centrepiece of the book is mortality,and how the government (most governments)dictate how we all meet our end,if we end up 'institutionalised' in the system.Michener is very balanced,but in the end sways very much toward Euthanasia,in my opinion.As for narrative,his ch [...]


  • Vintage MichenerA novel by one of my favorite authors. Not sure how I missed this book. 4 stars only because parts are dated, but the gist of the book makes me wonder if it had any part in the decisions he made in his own life. When I was working as a dialysis nurse, it was reported that James Michener, then in his 90's, was in renal failure and was receiving dialysis. I read that he did not want to continue his life in this manner so got his affairs in order, then stopped his dialysis, dying ab [...]


  • I found many parallels in this book with my own life, as my father is medical director at an assisted living facility. I believe this is the first Michener work I've ever read, though I've had many of them close at hand for years. Texas, Hawaii, Alaska and others would have been more likely to have been my first Michener picks, but I was not dis-satisfied that fate allowed Recessional to be my introduction to the works of James Michener.Recessional is James Michener's last novel and it seems obv [...]


  • A novel by one of my favorite authors. Not sure how I missed this book. 4 stars only because parts are dated, but the gist of the book makes me wonder if it had any part in the decisions he made in his own life. When I was working as a dialysis nurse, it was reported that James Michener, then in his 90's, was in renal failure and was receiving dialysis. I read that he did not want to continue his life in this manner so got his affairs in order, then stopped his dialysis, dying about 2 weeks late [...]


  • I read this book back in the mid-nineties and was surprised when it was published because my favorite author at that time was nearing ninety and living in a Tampa area nursing home. I recall much of this because I was living very close to this location on the causeway between Tampa and Clearwater. This was not his last publication, but it was, appropriately his last novel. This epic also was not Michener's most entertaining effort, but it was insightful and thoughtful and gave a realistic look i [...]


  • For those of us who wonder what a retirement facility is, this is a definitive explanation (expose?). This one is set in the Tampa Bay region of Florida, and has three sections: (A) Fully ambulatory (can drive, etc.), in a full apartment, with an option to eat one meal per day in a communal dining room; (B) Assisted living (needs some help); (C) "Health Center" (bedridden/hospice). It focuses on a new director, who is a very likable doctor from Illinois but cannot practice in Florida. Included a [...]


  • A good read and very timely for me. Friends are moving into a retirement home and I have a home in a senior community. This book encompasses situation from both places because it deals with the residents and new director of a large retirement complex. There was just enough story line to keep it like a novel rather than a documentary but I do think the ending was unsatisfactory. Too many people were killed off. Now I know in communities like these people die but these were often unusual deaths. T [...]


  • James Michener outdid himself this time. Unlike some of his epic length novels, which I have difficulty finishing because of time constraints, this one is more managable at about 500 pgs. The story is very captivating and the characters have a broad range of qualities that make them very believable. This is a must read.


  • OK, perhaps Michener is not the most poetic author of all time, but this was an interesting book which covered many of the problems of aging and retirement centers. It was full of the background stories of the people in the center, as well as the story of the main character, Dr. Zorn, who was the director of the center. I think this book was well written and interesting to me.


  • I haven't visited with Michener for a while and realized how much I missed his writing. This is a very solid effort about a Florida Retiremen/Health care facility, the people associated with it, and the complex medical and policy issues at the time of its writing in the early 90's.


  • Excellent passage of lifeLife of people as they near the end of their days with joy sadness and wisdom. True portrayal of the prejudice and issues of aging with dignity.



  • As someone who works in a retirement community very similar to the Palms, I fell in love with this work!Michener was tedious in his research. He definitely nailed down the innerworkings of an independent living retirement community in terms of finance, medicine, and common complaints (especially the dining and parking)!I notice that some movies or books that focus on seniors sometimes overemphasize the memories of the character, the things that they did when they were young, over the person they [...]


  • A socialist manifesto trying to masquerade as a disjointed story of unrelated themes. The author manages to invoke racism, AIDS, abortion rights, euthanasia, health care and mixed marriage, amongst other topics, all from the sympathetic perspective of the left. I was waiting for them to save the whales, but I guess manatees were a reasonable stand-in. With that said, the story was neither interesting nor entertaining.


  • 3.5 starsThis book is not your typical Michener. I picked it up used for someone and read it when I ran out of books to read during a snow storm. It takes place at The Palms retirement community. It would probably be of interest to someone dealing with caregiver issues. It goes into the politics of nursing homes as well as living wills, malpractice, children’s attitudes, AIDS, Alzheimer’s and euthanasia. It does this through its many and varied residents stories.


  • The first thing I have to say is that I am a HUGE Michener fan. Have all his books in hardcover and have read most of them several times. I can't believe it took me a week to wade through this book, and even then, I skimmed the last few chapters. Boring, and totally not worth my time, I'm very sad to say, cause I was thrilled to come across a Michener title I'd never heard of in a used book store. SOOO disappointed. I don't have anything else to say about this book.


  • Written in 1994, and a bit dated, Michener writes about a continuing care center in Florida. It reminds me of the one my mother loves in in North Carolina. In this book, the reader meets the staff, medical team and residents. Policy, procedures and financially sound investing is a realty. It is also a growing business caring for aging adults, whose family members expect and demand exceptional care that includes safety, compassion, dignity, and an appealing environment.


  • Typical long-winded James Michener fare. He covered ALL aspects of aging and the challenges e face as we age. He was 87 when he wrote it.





  • Everyone should read it, not only for the enjoyment of the good story, but also to deeply think individually about our own aging and our own mortality. The author was contemplating his own failing health while he was kept alive by kidney dialysis. After doing his research and considering his own options, he decided to move into an up-scale facility in Florida. While he lived there and contemplated his own "recession" from life, he wrote this, his last book: "Recessional".The protagonist is a law [...]


  • I've always been a fan of Michener's, but this one certainly doesn't fit his typical historical epic tales. I found it to be dated to some degree, but that's to be expected. A lot of what he grapples with is now old news Aides, euthanasia, etc. We have developed ways of coping with them in new ways that make this novel seem archaic at times.That being said, the process of aging in this type of setting is still very modern and relevant. I've worked in assisted-living and skilled nursing for the l [...]


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