Black Sheep and Lame Ducks: The Origins of Even More Phrases We Use Every Day

Black Sheep and Lame Ducks The Origins of Even More Phrases We Use Every Day The fun and fascinating follow up to the international bestseller Red Herrings and White Elephants Why do people put their skeletons in a closet have a hunch get the cold shoulder get dressed up to

  • Title: Black Sheep and Lame Ducks: The Origins of Even More Phrases We Use Every Day
  • Author: Albert Jack
  • ISBN: 9780399535123
  • Page: 350
  • Format: Paperback
  • The fun and fascinating follow up to the international bestseller Red Herrings and White Elephants Why do people put their skeletons in a closet, have a hunch, get the cold shoulder, get dressed up to the nines, or call a spade a spade These phrases are used every day, yet most people have little or no idea where most of them come from In Black Sheep and LameThe fun and fascinating follow up to the international bestseller Red Herrings and White Elephants Why do people put their skeletons in a closet, have a hunch, get the cold shoulder, get dressed up to the nines, or call a spade a spade These phrases are used every day, yet most people have little or no idea where most of them come from In Black Sheep and Lame Ducks, Albert Jack takes readers on a journey through the curious and often bizarre origins of hundreds of their favorite idioms and expressions For example, wearing your heart on your sleeve comes from the Middle Ages, when a lady would give her heart in the form of a handkerchief pinned to the sleeve of a knight who was about to go into battle And calling someone the black sheep in the family refers to a thousands year old belief that a black lamb in a flock was unpopular because its fleece was undyeable and therefore less valuable With Black Sheep and Lame Ducks, any language lover can feel like a Smart Aleck and also know exactly who that was.

    • Black Sheep and Lame Ducks: The Origins of Even More Phrases We Use Every Day by Albert Jack
      350 Albert Jack
    • thumbnail Title: Black Sheep and Lame Ducks: The Origins of Even More Phrases We Use Every Day by Albert Jack
      Posted by:Albert Jack
      Published :2019-08-11T09:08:34+00:00

    About " Albert Jack "

  • Albert Jack

    Albert Jack, pen name for Graham Willmott, is an international best selling author and historian He is an expert in explaining the unexplained and has appeared on live television shows and has made thousands of radio appearances worldwide.

  • 902 Comments

  • I found this book at the Goodwill store, where I do most of my book shopping. You could read this book in one afternoon. It's that good! I enjoyed reading all about the different "coined phrases" and old sayings and the histories and stories on where they originated. Super fun! 5 stars.


  • I enjoyed reading about how different phrases became mainstream. May even use a few in my everyday conversations.


  • I was disappointed because this volume wasn't written nearly as well as the others in the series. That being said, there were some interesting entries.


  • I've been reading this on and off in the bathroom for a year or two now. It's interesting. A bunch of the phrases are either from out the US or I just haven't heard them used before, so I skipped those. Really this is the kind of "information" that make good conversation starters. Like when someone says, "Here's mud in your eye." and you say, "Did you know that phrase actually came from" Then you sound all smart and women swoon, and guys think your a pretentious ass, or maybe just everybody thin [...]


  • This was a pretty interesting read. Many of the "every day phrases" it includes I had never heard of before, but I think it may be due to them being mainly sayings from England. I did find most of the explanations to be a bit ubiquitous. The author gives many takes on the same phrase, so it's difficult to come up with a true origin story. With that said, it did seem like the author spent time researching the origins and gave some pretty interesting information nonetheless.


  • 3.5 starsInteresting though many of the "common" phrases I'd never encountered. Also the sarcasm was a bit thick in places and some better editing would have been nice.



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