Real-Life Homeschooling: The Stories of 21 Families Who Teach Their Children at Home

Real Life Homeschooling The Stories of Families Who Teach Their Children at Home The book that shows homeschooling in action What does it really mean when parents say they homeschool their child or children For Rhonda Barfield a homeschooler for the past years the definition is

  • Title: Real-Life Homeschooling: The Stories of 21 Families Who Teach Their Children at Home
  • Author: Rhonda Barfield
  • ISBN: 9780743442299
  • Page: 226
  • Format: Paperback
  • The book that shows homeschooling in action What does it really mean when parents say they homeschool their child or children For Rhonda Barfield a homeschooler for the past 10 years the definition is as diverse as the 21 families she studies in this eye opening book Real Life Homeschooling From the city to the country, apartments to split levels, you ll enter eThe book that shows homeschooling in action What does it really mean when parents say they homeschool their child or children For Rhonda Barfield a homeschooler for the past 10 years the definition is as diverse as the 21 families she studies in this eye opening book Real Life Homeschooling From the city to the country, apartments to split levels, you ll enter each household and see education in action Discover the challenges and rewards of tailoring instruction to each child s needs while catering to his or her inquisitiveness and curiosity See why the number of children being taught by their parents is growing nationwide at home, there are no overcrowded classrooms, no unknown dangers lurking in the halls, and no doubts as to the quality of the education Whether you are just contemplating homeschooling or are a veteran seeking fresh ideas and help in overcoming obstacles look no further Real life Homeschooling shows just how practical and rewarding it is to educate children and provide them with what they need most you

    • Real-Life Homeschooling: The Stories of 21 Families Who Teach Their Children at Home >> Rhonda Barfield
      226 Rhonda Barfield
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      Posted by:Rhonda Barfield
      Published :2019-05-13T00:16:20+00:00

    About " Rhonda Barfield "

  • Rhonda Barfield

    Rhonda Barfield Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Real-Life Homeschooling: The Stories of 21 Families Who Teach Their Children at Home book, this is one of the most wanted Rhonda Barfield author readers around the world.

  • 229 Comments

  • Yeah, I'm not saying the book was a bad read, because it was interesting--who doesn't like a good anecdote?--but seriously, does every single family in the book have to be devoutly Christian and have a million kids? It's totally cool to be devoutly Christian and have a million kids, of course, but after the second devoutly Christian large family described in the book, I got the idea of what it's like to homeschool a million kids as a devout Christian, and didn't really need to hear about it from [...]


  • This is one of those books that I'm glad I read, would not read again, and would probably not recommend to anyone. The book is 21 interviews with families from different religions and walks of life that homeschool, written in a long news story format. It was interesting to see how different people made the decision to homeschool, what teaching styles they use, and so on. I felt the book leaned really hard on the side of unschooling, and when they did talk about a specific curriculum (such as Son [...]


  • This was an interesting look into a few families and how they homeschool. As I don't yet have children, there is nothing from this book that I can implement at the moment. However, I enjoyed reading about different approaches to homeschooling.One thing I noted almost across the board was that these families are BUSY. I'm excited to homeschool children someday, but I don't want to be that busy. There was one family that was only home for one evening a week. They seemed happy with that, but what a [...]


  • Just started this--each chapter is written by a different family that homeschools. What I like is the diversity of each family and it's story--it shows by real example that there really is no "one right way" to homeschool. Do what works. I'm curious to read what has worked for other families to give me some perspective and inspiration for mine.I found the best example of a homeschool family (which lives in UT, and I am pretty sure is LDS, too). The mom's philosophies were so close to mine it was [...]


  • I didn't glean much from this book, but found it interesting to delve into the day to day lives of other, highly disparate homeschoolers. There were only a couple of chapters (i.e homeschool experiences) that resonated with me, which left me skimming a lot of the book. One of the down-sides of this book was that I found myself feeling overwhelmed by the sheer volume of things each family seemed to do. I had to remind myself that if someone packed everything we do in a week, and then over the cou [...]


  • This book profiles 21 families whose demographics and reasons for homeschooling vary widely. I appreciated how each chapter described the family's typical daily schedule and listed the specific materials and curricula employed. Many of the families cite religion as a factor for homeschooling and I was impressed by their commitment to raising children of strong moral values. Overall a very rosy profile is painted and the author points out that by allowing each family to relate their own story the [...]


  • I am reading more about homeschooling and liking more and more what I'm reading. This was a fun look into a variety of homeschooling philosophies and strategies. It also provided a lot of the nitty gritty details of how you juggle everything in your life. When thinking about homeschooling I really wonder what it would be like. Each family gave a daily description which I appreciated. Some families home-schooled in a way I admired while others in a way I know wouldn't work for me. This was a fun [...]


  • This book was amazing. I was so encouraged by he families interviewed. Two were from nearby towns! No matter how different their educational philosophy or family situation, I found I was able to identify with at least one part of each story. A few families felt like they were actually giving all my reasons for "why" I am choosing homeschooling. Really great read to get excited about homeschooling or to encourage anyone who is struggling or suffring from burnout!


  • This would be a terrific resource for someone considering homeschooling who wants to know what options are available. I didn't learn much at all from it after all the research I have done. I am finishing it because there are a couple resources listed in each chapter and it's a quick read to find those.


  • The structure of this book made it easy to follow despite the disjointed feeling I had jumping from family to family to learn of their homeschooling experiences. I learned of several resources and methods that I plan to try during my homeschooling journey and felt that it was really helpful to hear first hand accounts of how homeschooling affects families.


  • This got repetitive after about 5 families - most were some variety of Christian homeschoolers, which is fine, but it all started to sound the same after awhile. There were a couple extraordinary stories (getting arrested for homeschool, homeschool in a cabin on a frozen lake in Alaska).I preferred Lisa Welcher's book.


  • This book contains the stories of 21 families who are homeschooling for reasons all along the spectrum: religious & non-religious, rigid curriculum & unschoolingjust about every reason under the sun. Christian families were disproportionately represented, though, and I wonder whether that's actually representative of homeschooling families country- and world-wide.


  • I enjoyed this book. I would have much preferred a more rounded collection of homeschooling families - this collection was by and large heavily religious. I did still enjoy reading all their stories. I would be interested in reading a more contemporary, more secular, book similar to this.


  • This is a decent introductory book to homeschooling. It answers the question, "what do homeschoolers do all day?" But after half of it I felt like I got it and didn't need to read anymore. I felt like there was a little too much detail about the history of the families.


  • LOVING this book and the variety of ideas/methods/beliefs. My friend recommended it and said I wouldn't be able to put it down. If only I weren't reading 5 books at once, perhaps that would be true. Really, it is a great read.


  • I learned there are sooo many different ways to homeschool, and they are all good. This book helped take the pressure off me so that I hopefully not worry too much about whether we are doing homeschooling "right". It's all good.


  • I really appreciated the chapters on the families living in the Marshall Islands and Alaska. It was fun to hear about how environment can impact the homeschooling experience.


  • I didn't identify with the families portrayed in this book as much as I'd hoped, nor did they seem to represent as wide a scope of folks as the recommendation claimed, but it was still interesting.




  • I thoroughly enjoyed this book. Some stories, of course, were far more intriguing than others. *Remember to read again in the future.





  • I love books like this. I read it with a notebook and pen to take notes on things I want to implement in my own homeschool. Each family was unique and brought great ideas to the table.


  • I read many of the stories in this book, but not all. An assortment that gives the idea that homeschooling is as individual as the family, and, indeed, as individual as the child.


  • We are making the switch to Homeschoolingmething we have talked about for a couple of years now. Since non-fiction is my gig these days, I love this book.


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