Time

Time In the vein of popular science successes such as THE CALENDAR and FERMAT S LAST THEOREM TIME looks at man s obsessive and ingenious efforts to measure and label the dimension that dominates our lives

  • Title: Time
  • Author: Alexander Waugh
  • ISBN: 9780747259886
  • Page: 370
  • Format: Paperback
  • In the vein of popular science successes such as THE CALENDAR and FERMAT S LAST THEOREM, TIME looks at man s obsessive and ingenious efforts to measure and label the dimension that dominates our lives Waugh looks at every aspect of time from the Big Bang, through clock time and calendars to the end of time Drawing on Waugh s polymathic knowledge of art, music, literatuIn the vein of popular science successes such as THE CALENDAR and FERMAT S LAST THEOREM, TIME looks at man s obsessive and ingenious efforts to measure and label the dimension that dominates our lives Waugh looks at every aspect of time from the Big Bang, through clock time and calendars to the end of time Drawing on Waugh s polymathic knowledge of art, music, literature, science and social history, this is a hugely entertaining examination of the big questions about time how were seconds, minutes and hours agreed how were the various calendars arrived at and why are there twelve months in a year and seven days in a week

    • Time BY Alexander Waugh
      370 Alexander Waugh
    • thumbnail Title: Time BY Alexander Waugh
      Posted by:Alexander Waugh
      Published :2019-09-05T07:22:07+00:00

    About " Alexander Waugh "

  • Alexander Waugh

    Alexander Waugh Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Time book, this is one of the most wanted Alexander Waugh author readers around the world.

  • 827 Comments

  • Very interesting subject matter which the author Alexander Waugh handles with a literary style of writing. This is a style I do not like nor one that I think fits scientific based subjects. I found Waugh's wordy delivery bogged down the great information he had to present.


  • Fascinating book. Waugh was able to take a complex, fairly dry subject and present it as entertaining, as well as informative. The one thing that disappointed me though was the lack of women present in the text. Yeah yeah, I know about women's historic role in the Church and in science, but I feel there were some real missed opportunities to have said, "Maybe a man didn't do this." A perfect example would have been for the chapter entitled "Menses" (for God's sake). The Ishango bone was a tool f [...]


  • Alexander Waugh has written a book about a topic which is grand in scope and he has done a good job of exploring such a common, but at the same time barely understood concept. From the point of view of History TIME is a well-written book. He entertainingly explores the concept of time through history with many enjoyable anecdotes and examples. The Science is well-explained, allowing those of us without PhDs to grasp the more esoteric ideas relating to Time. Waugh is prone to wandering off-topic [...]


  • One of those books you can read again and again!: The sort of book you want to read again and again!The is is an extraordinary book - not just because of all the fascinating things that it tells you about time, but because of the way the author plays the reader. He lets you suppose one thing and changes tack, telling you that what you had just learned was not in fact true. The reader needs to stay on his toes, not be fooled by this ingenious method, the author seems to be telling us not to take [...]


  • A strange way to talk about how our time systems came to exist the way they are now. With the exception of the Day, Month and Year, all of our other time frames are human manufactured, and the way that they came to exist is fascinating. This book describes in minute detail every time component from the second up to the Millenium, and then jumps into some high-level physics and talkes about relativity and quantum mechanics.


  • A witty history of time everything from how we ended up with a 7-day week, and why our fascination with decades is just as absurd as the Gnostic's belief in the spirituality of numbers to how physicists define space-time. The writer's smart and conversational. It's also a good book to read in stages I read it in fits and starts over the course of several months.


  • This sprightly, delightful book is just the sort of read for an idle afternoon, running through the history of time keeping, with some side jaunts into the mathematics of time. There are also reveries on time according to various individuals, as well as cultures. (I would have loved more of this, and less of the math, which just taxes my dyslexic brain, but others might relish the number talk.)


  • Well written, with a chapter devoted to each of the units of time that we know now - starting with seconds, and going all the way up to a millenium. The last few chapters deal with complex time and eternity.


  • If this book was not filled with Waugh's very unfunny attempts at humour this book would have been worth 5 stars.



  • Interesting discussion of the history of the measurement of time with some discussion of the philosophy of time



  • What wit and research. The historical parts are fascinating, the science was hard to grasp. Probably just my small frontal lobe that couldn't grasp it.


  • I give up - I'm bored, I don't care and I don't care for his writing style. I need fiction. I'm still giving it three stars because it isn't bad, just isn't for me.


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