On the Bottom

On the Bottom In a collision with a steamship City of Rome on the night of September the U S Navy Submarine S sank in feet of water taking sailors to the ocean floor This is the story of the

  • Title: On the Bottom
  • Author: Edward Ellsberg Edward L. Beach
  • ISBN: 9780451211514
  • Page: 437
  • Format: Paperback
  • In a collision with a steamship, City of Rome, on the night of September 25, 1925, the U.S Navy Submarine S 51 sank in 132 feet of water, taking 33 sailors to the ocean floor This is the story of the men charged with doing the impossible raising the thousand ton sub from the bottom of the sea Added to this modern classic of true adventure are a foreword and afterword giIn a collision with a steamship, City of Rome, on the night of September 25, 1925, the U.S Navy Submarine S 51 sank in 132 feet of water, taking 33 sailors to the ocean floor This is the story of the men charged with doing the impossible raising the thousand ton sub from the bottom of the sea Added to this modern classic of true adventure are a foreword and afterword giving specifics of the accident and the aftermath, additional photographs, a publisher s preface, and appendices.

    • On the Bottom By Edward Ellsberg Edward L. Beach
      437 Edward Ellsberg Edward L. Beach
    • thumbnail Title: On the Bottom By Edward Ellsberg Edward L. Beach
      Posted by:Edward Ellsberg Edward L. Beach
      Published :2019-06-06T11:50:31+00:00

    About " Edward Ellsberg Edward L. Beach "

  • Edward Ellsberg Edward L. Beach

    Edward Ellsberg 1891 1983 graduated first in his class from the United States Naval Academy in 1914 After he did a stint aboard the USS Texas, the navy sent Ellsberg to Massachusetts Institute of Technology for postgraduate training in naval architecture In 1925, he played a key role in the salvage of the sunken submarine USS S 51 and became the first naval officer to qualify as a deep sea diver Ellsberg later received the Distinguished Service Medal for his innovations and hard work.Rear Admiral Ellsberg was awarded the C.B.E by His Majesty King George VI, and two Legions of Merit by the United States Government.

  • 637 Comments

  • This book is special to me. My late father read it to me when I was too young to read, and when I could read, he always said I read it back to him. (I don't really remember that second part. I learned to read freakishly young.) He, in turn, read this book when he was young, since it was published the year after he was born.Personal history aside, this is an excellent book. If you want a manual on how to tell a technologically complex tale, Ellsberg does it. He brings you the cast of characters, [...]


  • Compelling reading, easy to read. Kept me up at night not wanting to quit reading. A Detailed account of the trials and tribulations of the first successful raising of a large submarine after it was rammed and sunk with loss of most hands back in the late 20's. The risks those guys took while doing that work were unbelievable, and I"d guess many of the divers suffered aftereffects for the rest of their lives. I don't think, knowing what we know now, that anyone would work in such difficult circu [...]


  • Ellsberg is every bit the sailor. You'll need to go to the terms glossary frequently to understand all of the nautical terms he uses and I served in the USN. The book is written in nearly mind numbing detail. I found myself skipping over much of this to focus on the highlights of the story line, which was excellent. To think what they accomplished in 1925 in raising S-51, is just incredible. We landlubbers don't realize the power of the sea. That fact comes home loud and clear. Glad I read the b [...]


  • Excellent read. The ony thing I didn't like was that the author neglected to mention the date of the accident, but despite that, I recommend this book.


  • Interesting, detailed, but really dry, story of the first successful raising of a U.S. Navy Submarine, in 1926.


  • My experience with this book is oddly similar to that of James, the last person to review it. My father, a career Navy officer, didn't read it to me, but I think it may have been the first non-children's book I ever read when I swiped it off his bookshelf at age 7 or 8. That's probably why, decades later, I read Clive Cussler's Raise the Titanic and came away so totally disgusted that I've never been able to read anything else that author has written. It's as clear and well-written an account of [...]


  • An excellent account of the raising of the sunken S-51, a U.S. submarine rammed by the _City of Rome_, a merchant steamer, in 1925. The author, Lt. Commander Edward Ellsberg, a 1914 Naval Academy graduate, was the senior specialist attached to the flotilla assigned the task of raising the submarine. This is Ellsberg's account of the two-year salvage effort. It is a dramatic story of courage and perseverance in the face of multiple setbacks that tested the limits of existing technology. In the co [...]


  • I *love* this book. It reads like an action-adventure novel. The only way this could be improved would be to change the title. It kind of gives away the ending.




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