The New Space Opera 2: All-new stories of science fiction adventure

The New Space Opera All new stories of science fiction adventure All new stories of science fiction adventure from some of the most beloved names in science fiction spin all new tales of interstellar adventure and wonder Contents Utriusque Cosmi novelette by

  • Title: The New Space Opera 2: All-new stories of science fiction adventure
  • Author: Gardner Dozois Jonathan Strahan Neal Asher Garth Nix Sean Williams Bruce Sterling Bill Willingham John Meaney
  • ISBN: 9780061562358
  • Page: 363
  • Format: Paperback
  • All new stories of science fiction adventure from some of the most beloved names in science fiction spin all new tales of interstellar adventure and wonder.Contents 3 Utriusque Cosmi 2009 novelette by Robert Charles Wilson27 The Island 2009 novelette by Peter Watts63 Events Preceding the Helvetican Renaissance 2009 novelette by John Kessel93 To GoAll new stories of science fiction adventure from some of the most beloved names in science fiction spin all new tales of interstellar adventure and wonder.Contents 3 Utriusque Cosmi 2009 novelette by Robert Charles Wilson27 The Island 2009 novelette by Peter Watts63 Events Preceding the Helvetican Renaissance 2009 novelette by John Kessel93 To Go Boldly shortstory by Cory Doctorow113 The Lost Princess Man 2009 novelette by John Barnes139 Defect 2009 novelette by Kristine Kathryn Rusch175 To Raise a Mutiny Betwixt Yourselves 2009 novelette by Jay Lake209 Shell Game 2009 novelette by Neal Asher237 Punctuality 2009 shortstory by Garth Nix245 Inevitable 2009 novelette by Sean Williams273 Join The Navy and See the Worlds 2009 shortstory by Bruce Sterling293 Fearless Space Pirates of the Outer Rings 2009 novelette by Bill Willingham321 From the Heart 2009 novelette by John Meaney353 Chameleons 2009 novella by Elizabeth Moon407 The Tenth Muse 2009 novelette by Tad Williams431 Cracklegrackle 2009 novelette by Justina Robson465 The Tale of the Wicked 2009 novelette by John Scalzi487 Catastrophe Baker and a Canticle for Leibowitz 2009 shortstory by Mike Resnick501 The Far End of History 2009 novelette by John C Wright

    • The New Space Opera 2: All-new stories of science fiction adventure - Gardner Dozois Jonathan Strahan Neal Asher Garth Nix Sean Williams Bruce Sterling Bill Willingham John Meaney
      363 Gardner Dozois Jonathan Strahan Neal Asher Garth Nix Sean Williams Bruce Sterling Bill Willingham John Meaney
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      Posted by:Gardner Dozois Jonathan Strahan Neal Asher Garth Nix Sean Williams Bruce Sterling Bill Willingham John Meaney
      Published :2019-01-13T08:11:02+00:00

    About " Gardner Dozois Jonathan Strahan Neal Asher Garth Nix Sean Williams Bruce Sterling Bill Willingham John Meaney "

  • Gardner Dozois Jonathan Strahan Neal Asher Garth Nix Sean Williams Bruce Sterling Bill Willingham John Meaney

    Gardner Raymond Dozois born July 23, 1947 is an American science fiction author and editor He was editor of Asimov s Science Fiction magazine from 1984 to 2004 He has won multiple Hugo and Nebula awards, both as an editor and a writer of short fiction entry Gardner Dozoisuscmillan author gardne

  • 223 Comments

  • LOVED this collection. Think I'm on a hard sci-fi kick though, so this really rung true with me! All the stories were interesting (a few too pretentious in that hard sci-fi way, but surprisingly few). Particularly liked Elizabeth Moon's, and Sean Williams (always forget how much I like this author!) I know this ground might feel familiar to aficionados of this genre, but especially for ppl not as immersed, this is really a good compilation!


  • Excellent anthology; 19 stories from totally different authors than NSO1; big time highlights from John Barnes and JC Wright with highlights from RC Wilson, P. Watts, E. Moon, new author Bill Willingham, N. Asher, S. Williams, KK Rusch, J. Robson, J. Meaney and quite good stories from Jay Lake, John Kessel, Mike Resnick and Tad Williams.Only the Doctorow, Nix, Sterling (none surprisingly since neither of these authors is readable by me) and Scalzi (surprising since I generally like his work) did [...]


  • As usual, some good, some not-so-much, a lot of worth reading.Good: "Chameleons" by Elizabeth Moon; "The Tale of the _Wicked_" by John Scalzi; "Defect" by Kristine Kathryn Rusch; Not-so-much: "The Far End of History" by John C. Wright (the mythical and astronomy babble of the first 3 segments stopped me from going further; YMMV, as they say); "Catastrophe Baker and a Canticle for Leibowitz" was just too cutesy.


  • When Wilson Tucker coined the term “space opera” in 1941 to refer to “the hacky, grinding, stinking, outworn space-ship yarn”, he can’t have imagined the sub-genre would still be going strong sixty-nine years later. Or indeed that it would be considered one of the more successful forms of science fiction. That’s not to say that the “outworn space-ship yarn” no longer exists. There are plenty of examples of it being published in the twenty-first century. Some of them are even spac [...]


  • Dozois is my go to editor for science ficiton. I have been reading Dozois' Year's Best Science Fiction for twenty years now and he almost never disappoints me (his co-editor, Honathan Strahan is no slouch either). I find it strange and wonderful that my editorial aesthetic matches so closely with his. This usually means that I can't wait to get into a Dozois anthology. Usually. The New Space Opera 2 is the follow-up anthology to last year's The New Space Opera. New space opera is one of my favor [...]


  • As a fan of both fantasy and SciFi I feel as though I've been neglecting half of my soul. Time to rectify that. My favorites have always been good old fashioned space operas. Poul Anderson. Isaac Asimov. But I'm not too familiar with contemporary authors. Thought this would be a good collection to start with.I never know how to review short story collections. By an average? By my favorites? Today I've decided to go with the second choice. So not every story here is worth a four star rating. But [...]


  • I do have a bad habit with anthologies I’ve been published in. I tend to receive them then stick them on a shelf as eye-candy yet, of course, they probably contain lots of stories I would like to read. The other day I changed that habit by picking up The New Space Opera edited by Gardner Dozois and Jonathan Strahan. It contains a story by me called Shell Game, and has been sitting on my shelf since 2009. I did enjoy this and out of the 19 stories enclosed there were only two I didn’t finish [...]


  • Mostly excellent stories here, though there were a couple I didn't care for. Doctorow's riff on some "Star Trek" cliches was a blast!




  • This anthology was a mixed bag of stories by some of today's top sci-fi talent. Some of it was great, some not so great, and some I thought was pretentious artsy garbage more interested in impressing critics than telling stories. Of course YMMV. Here's a short breakdown.Liked:Events Preceding the Helvetican Renaissance by John Kessel - neat take on human religion and spirituality in a space opera settingThe Lost Princess Man by John Barnes - This had great potential. The premise is a new take on [...]


  • Finished the collection The New Space Opera 2, edited by Gardner Dozois.All these stories are set in the far future, with very advanced tech, and often a rather loose definition of human. Most of them are OK, although, unfortunately, there are few WOW moments, and some stories that don't make all that much sense.Detailed review:ꉿ Robert Charles Wilson: “Ultriusque cosmi” Carlotta was taken away by aliens when Earth exploded. Now, she's travelling back in time, in order to close a time loop [...]


  • October 2013 book group selection. Kinda. I didn't realize there was a New Space Opera 1 and a New Space Opera 2 with nearly the same covers. I grabbed 2. Oops! In my defense, Space Opera 2 was the only one available as an e-book. Ultimately, it all worked out. Mixed thoughts on this selection that stemmed partly from my inability to get into the stories - I wasn't in the mood. Some selections were better than others, and what I may like, someone else detests. Overall, recommended. 1) Utriusque [...]


  • There is nothing mind-blowing here, but all of it is readable and some is pretty good. The story that came closest to greatness, in my opinion, was Peter Watts' The Island. It had truly epic scale and a believeable sense of the human as alien and the alien as maybe human after all.


  • What do people mean when they say something was "well written". It's always bothered me, and this compendium of stories yet again makes me wonder. A lot (most) (actually, nearly all) of these stories I found difficult to read for one reason or another. Either they were too simple: "The Tale of the Wicked" by John Scalzi "Fearless Space Pirates of the Outer Rings" by Bill Willingham.or they were too hard (tiresome) to figure out:"The Island" by Peter Watts.or they seemed, once the first few parag [...]


  • Well, the stories had to do with space, so I'll give it that. Aside from being stories about space, there were only a few stories in this collection that I would say were worth my time to read (e.g "The Lost Princess Man", "The Tale of the Wicked", "Utriusque Cosmi", and "To Go Boldly").So many of the stories were trying so desperately hard to be poignant or meaningful or "current" that they ultimately just ended up being confusing, depressing, and/or pointless. The biggest wastes of time (the o [...]


  • I'm still not precisely sure what defines space opera, I just like the phrase, and this short story collection caught my eye at our local bookstore for the selection of authors, most of whom I'd either read and enjoyed some of their work, or at least knew about.For the most part, I thoroughly enjoyed this book. The stories were engaging and well-written, and most of them made very good short stories; only one or two I thought could easily make good longer works, and they were still delightful sh [...]


  • Whew! There's a few hours I will never get back. Of the many stories in this collection there were only three I thought were actually interesting and well written. Elizabeth Moon's Chameleons is wonderful! There were a couple more that weren't completely horrible. The remainder were either outright bad or incredibly and completely horrible.I have never read so many puffed up pieces with little or no story in one volume. I love sci fi. My tastes are varied from light to hard, short stories to lon [...]


  • The New Space Opera 2: All-New Tales of Science Fiction Adventure is, as its name implies, the second of Gardner Dozois and Jonathan Strahan’s themed anthologies attempting to put a modern spin on space opera, a subgenre of science fiction which causes many of us to think of big metal spaceships crewed by handsome blaster-wielding men who protect us from evil aliens that want to destroy the Earth, or at least steal it’s shrieking scantily clad women. We laugh at these old stories now — the [...]


  • More miss than hits, and a strong avoidance of any 'hard' writing. Going by this book's collection, new space opera seems to be a romanticised and personalized account of how lead characters feel while spacemagic the ever wondrous just sort of happens. Except when even that does not happen, and the stories of 1970s' tourist escapades are given a veneer of the magicspacestationish.And maybe short stories just aren't my thing, but this amalgamation of them had little flow or consistency, and the u [...]


  • I thought this was an interesting collection of new space opera science fiction. There is a great mixture of stories, ranging from the humorous to the deeply thought-provoking. On the whole I liked the collection. My one sizable complaint however is that there were a few stories that, while I did enjoy, I did not think were proper 'space opera' stories. Perhaps it's just a personal preference or how I would personally differentiate between what I consider what is and is not in the sub-genre. Tha [...]


  • While there were some definite winners in the collection, no two readers seem to agree on which ones they were. This suggests to me that the editors were trying a little too hard to "scattergun" the contents, especially since some of the stories were wildly far from anything that could be called "space opera." To me, at least, the term suggests adventure SF, and several of the stories work within that definition. The John Wright story, however, was more like a New Wave story mixed with Cordwaine [...]


  • The collection starts off with the grandest Opera of them all, Utriusque Cosmi by C. Wilson. How grander can a story gets if the theme is about birth and death and rebirth of .Wilson is a character driven writer, surprised he managed to weave an excellent space opera here (i guess anything is possible from a Master LOL). Peter Watts' The Island, i'm confused to what it's about, and the story is too dried to force myself for a re-read (just for the sake of understanding its merits behind the hugo [...]


  • You always get a variety of quality in anthologies. I picked this up solely for the Cory Doctorow and John scalzi stories. Scalzi's was very good, Doctorow's was okay, and the rest varied from interesting but forgettable to outright bad (Garth Nix's story's only redeeming quality was that it was short. John C. Wright's 'The Far End of History' was ponderous and seriously made me consider giving up). A few of the stories were interesting twists or approaches to science fiction adventure, but a nu [...]


  • A very entertaining selection of postmodern (I guess you would call them) science fiction spectacles about galactic empires and such that is for the most part a joy to read. A few are a little old-fashioned for my taste, but for the most part the imagination that is unleashed in these stories is fantastic. However, it might be worth noting that even the best stories often fall within some of the modern tropes of space opera, such as uploaded (and downloaded) consciousnesses. Pieces of story such [...]


  • This is kind of a mixed bag of short stories. Most of the authors here are well established SF writers, and they generally created very engaging worlds, though I found the plots and characters somewhat more lackluster. Standouts included "The Island" by Peter Watts, "To Raise a Mutiny Betwixt Yourselves" by Jay Lake (great universe and characters, somewhat flat story), and the hilarious "Catastrophe Baker and a Canticle for Leibowitz" by Mike Resnick. Overall very enjoyable, if somewhat uneven a [...]


  • This was worth reading for the die hard fans of science fiction and for the fans of short stories in general. I wouldn't go out of my way to get this particular book, it's certainly no DANGEROUS VISIONS or anything of that sort but it was okay. It took me longer to read than most science fiction does because some of the stories were just completely out there and bizarre. Maybe the editor's goal was to stagger the stories every other one in a way that he knew would keep people going. You know, li [...]


  • This review is just for the John C. Wright story "The Far End of History" but I don't know how to specify a short story that doesn't have a separate record in ' database. The story is set in the universe of The Golden Age trilogy, and shares some characters too. It's epic space opera about post-human occluded personalities falling in love, going to war, and destroying the galaxy. What's not to like?


  • okay - down to maybe 1.5, 8%? /not/ worth the time.-----make that 4 authors, 20%. returns getting worse.-----19 stories, 5 authors that I will read again, and one that I just could not get through. That was the Far End of History - the novella that ended the book, in every sense.Worth plodding through for 5 authors? will only know after I try their books. but 25% is an okay reaping, but getting there was a slog. 75% of not worth pursuing is a lot of not worth bothering.


  • I probably picked this up because I wanted to read some current short science fiction and saw that John Scalzi had an entry. Since I did not sit down and read it cover to cover, it looks like it took me about three years to get through it. As is typical for an anthology, some of the stories were pretty good, some not so much. I can't think of one that knocked my socks off. But most were worth the read.


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