Origins: The Scientific Story of Creation

Origins The Scientific Story of Creation What is life Where do we come from and how did we evolve What is the universe and how was it formed What is the nature of the material world How does it work How and why do we think What does it mean

  • Title: Origins: The Scientific Story of Creation
  • Author: Jim Baggott
  • ISBN: 9780198707646
  • Page: 411
  • Format: Hardcover
  • What is life Where do we come from and how did we evolve What is the universe and how was it formed What is the nature of the material world How does it work How and why do we think What does it mean to be human How do we know There are many different versions of our creation story This book tells the version according to modern science It is a unique account, stWhat is life Where do we come from and how did we evolve What is the universe and how was it formed What is the nature of the material world How does it work How and why do we think What does it mean to be human How do we know There are many different versions of our creation story This book tells the version according to modern science It is a unique account, starting at the Big Bang and traveling right up to the emergence of humans as conscious intelligent beings, 13.8 billion years later Chapter by chapter, it sets out the current state of scientific knowledge the origins of space and time energy, mass, and light galaxies, stars, and our sun the habitable earth, and complex life itself Drawing together the physical and biological sciences, Baggott recounts what we currently know of our history, highlighting the questions science has yet to answer.

    • Origins: The Scientific Story of Creation >> Jim Baggott
      411 Jim Baggott
    • thumbnail Title: Origins: The Scientific Story of Creation >> Jim Baggott
      Posted by:Jim Baggott
      Published :2019-09-08T09:49:38+00:00

    About " Jim Baggott "

  • Jim Baggott

    Jim Baggott completed his doctorate in physical chemistry at the University of Oxford and his postgraduate research at Stanford University.

  • 222 Comments

  • Every civilisation has its creation myths. These often beautiful stories describe how the world came into being and, most importantly in terms of the reason the stories exist, explore how we as humans relate to the wider universe. Jim Baggott, who is one of the few science writers able to make the Higgs boson comprehensible, has taken on an even greater challenge in writing a creation myth for the scientific age.Origins is a weighty tome - literally. Oxford University Press either incorporate a [...]


  • An excellent overview of current scientific thinking. This is not a book to skim, but, if you havekept up with current research, a book to read carefully. If it lacks in anything it is additional illustrations and diagrams.


  • The book is about 80% science and 20% naturalistic philosophy. It was to be expected. A lot of interesting things are covered, but it does seem to ramble somewhat. I was particularly attuned to the presence of what I call “magic words” and teleological or anthropomorphic language. Once one trains oneself to look for these, one realizes how ubiquitous they are in the realm of “science.’ Thus, words such as “emerges” “arises” and so forth should trip the credulity alarm. Words like [...]


  • Big History is the latest fad - highly important, but still a fad. Within this, a subfield is emerging about the evolution "to" the current moment that fuses three different evolutions: a. from the big bang or the first moments of creation to the solar system/the birth of earth through the field of astronomy; b. from the first life on earth to the dawn of humanity through the field of biological evolution and c. from the first humans and the birth of consciousness to now through the fields of ph [...]


  • Every major religion of Earth has a creation story, which describes the origin of universe and the 'roots' of the people. This story usually describes some prehistoric event which led to the creation of sun, stars and everything else that we see around us. This story culminates by describing how the people of a particular community who follow that religion came to be. These 'creation myths' form an important leitmotif of religious instruction.Suffice it to say, and I am sorry if this sounds rude [...]


  • In describing creation right back from the furthest moment possible to the metabolic quirks of the human race, ‘Origins’ is a book that is much more than the sum of its parts. Jim Baggott manages to guide a reader through some complex physics into the realms of biochemistry in one of the most adept explanations I have seen for some time of science applied to the world around us. Despite covering so much ground there is always a sense of the author constantly considering his audience and doin [...]


  • The scope of this book is really broad: from the very first moments of the Big Bang (or is it Big Bounce?) to the origin of consciousness through the formation of stars, of the solar system, of our planet, life, and the Homo Sapiens It doesn't shy away though from going into detailed scientific explanations of complex concepts (e.g stellar nucleosynthesis) so the most demanding intellects will have enough meat to chew on, but for more casual readers it's possible to tread lightly through those d [...]


  • Overall the content of the book was decent. I found there were a few points at the end of the book regarding the continuation of Human evolution I didn't fully agree with, in that in the last 10k years, my views are more along the lines of mutation and some artificial selection, in that there is a decreasing degree of natural selection pressure.Beyond that I found the book in audiobook format really hard to stick with because of the poor quality of the narrator. With long poorly placed pauses, s [...]


  • A great summary of scientific creation as is currently understood. Some speculation, but red flagged at each juncture and logically thought through.


  • Origins: The Scientific Story of Creation by Jim Baggott is a wonderfully readable account of 13.8 billion years worth of science. The story shifts about halfway through from mostly physics and chemistry to biology and chemistry (lets face it, chemistry is every where!).There can not be a truly comprehensive account of this science, at least not within a reasonable size. Even a three volume attempt would leave some things out, some explained less rigorously and even then only mention a fraction [...]


  • This is a superb account of our origins, based on what science has learned up to 2015, from the Big Bang to the emergence of consciousness in a primate that walks upright on two legs on the third planet of an average star located two thirds of the way out from the centre of a medium sized galaxy in a big universe. Jim Baggott writes his scientific story of creation in an engaging manner, and pulls no punches. Right from the start, he makes it clear that this is a book about origins according to [...]


  • Ok, this is not Neil De Grasse Tyson type of popular narrative. I knew that. But this book is extremely detailed, to the point of being hard core at times. Its probably a good thing for scientists, but for casual reader/science enthusiast reader - not so much. Author gets soo deep into details, that you will lose sight of bigger picture. Inevitably, you will ask yourself a question - "hold it, why am I reading this fragment, what it is connected to and how?" This is exactly the case with Jim Bag [...]


  • Origins is the science book every single person should read, and should be part of every high school curriculum. Jim Baggott succeeds in making the story of the creation of our universe and the origins of our being a truly compelling story. Baggott writes in clear, elegant language for the scientist, the student, the aficionado, and they layman alike. Origins makes such staggering and fundamental concepts as special relativity an approachable topic by helping the reader see behind the curtain an [...]


  • The first several hundred million years of creation stupefy me. The thinkologists discuss the first few trillionths of ~seconds after the Big Bang as Eon (or epoch, I began the book weeks ago) of This or That as the Bang became matter and energy. I just burble at all that. I need things to be on the macro level: I understand why the inner planets are rocky and the middle ones gaseous and the outer bits icy. So I need a few billion years to catch up. The author did assert that North America has n [...]


  • A wonderful narrative of what physics has come to understand about our origins. Though somewhat overly dismissive of string theory and multiverse theory, this is an in-depth, chronological description of the cosmos and our tiny little place in it.


  • I tried but this just didn't work for me as an audio book. A bit dull. I did really enjoy his other book Farewell to Reality.



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