Bardo or Not Bardo

Bardo or Not Bardo Irreducible to any single literary genre the Volodinian cosmos is skillfully crafted fusing elements of science fiction with magical realism and political commentary Nicholas Hauck Music Literature

  • Title: Bardo or Not Bardo
  • Author: Antoine Volodine J.T. Mahany
  • ISBN: 9781940953335
  • Page: 200
  • Format: Paperback
  • Irreducible to any single literary genre, the Volodinian cosmos is skillfully crafted, fusing elements of science fiction with magical realism and political commentary Nicholas Hauck, Music LiteratureOne of Volodine s funniest books, Bardo or Not Bardo takes place in his universe of failed revolutions, radical shamanism, and off kilter nomenclature.In each of thes Irreducible to any single literary genre, the Volodinian cosmos is skillfully crafted, fusing elements of science fiction with magical realism and political commentary Nicholas Hauck, Music LiteratureOne of Volodine s funniest books, Bardo or Not Bardo takes place in his universe of failed revolutions, radical shamanism, and off kilter nomenclature.In each of these seven vignettes, someone dies and has to make his way through the Tibetan afterlife, also known as the Bardo In the Bardo, souls wander for forty nine days before being reborn, helped along on their journey by the teachings of the Book of the Dead.Unfortunately, Volodine s characters bungle their chances at enlightenment, with the recently dead choosing to waste away their afterlife sleeping, or choosing to be reborn as an insignificant spider The still living aren t much better off, making a mess of things in their own ways, such as erroneously reciting a Tibetan cookbook to a lost comrade instead of the holy book.Once again, Volodine has demonstrated his range and ambition, crafting a moving, hysterical work about transformations and the power of the book.Antoine Volodine is the primary pseudonym of a French writer who has published twenty books under this name, several of which are available in English translation, such as Minor Angels, and Writers He also publishes under the names Lutz Bassmann and Manuela Draeger.J T Mahany is a graduate of the Master of Arts in Literary Translation Studies program at the University of Rochester and is currently studying for his MFA at the University of Arkansas.

    Bardo or Not Bardo by Antoine Volodine Aug , Bardo or not Bardo is his most impoverished in a positive Bersani s sense , most depopulated and most Irish novel imagine Flann O Brien and Samuel Beckett collaborating on variations of the final scene s from Fulci s THE BEYOND and Tolkin s THE RAPTURE. Bardo or Not Bardo Center for Literary Publishing Antoine Volodine s comic novel Bardo or Not Bardo is named after the Bardo Thodol, which is commonly known as The Tibetan Book of the Dead This religious text is meant to guide the souls of the deceased toward enlightenment or a higher reincarnation. Bardo or Not Bardo Excerpt Three Percent Next up is Bardo or Not Bardo, translated from the French by J.T Mahany Remember, if you use the code VOLODINE at checkout, you can get % off of all Volodine books Offer valid until midnight from Glouchenko B rass horns They can send a very deep note over an enormous distance, across the valley when there are mountains Bardo or Not Bardo Open Letter Apr , One of Volodine s funniest books, Bardo or Not Bardo takes place in his universe of failed revolutions, radical shamanism, and off kilter nomenclature In each of these seven vignettes, someone dies and has to make his way through the Tibetan afterlife, also known as the Bardo, where souls wander for forty nine days before being reborn with the help of the Book of the Dead. BARDO OR NOT BARDO, a novel by Antoine Volodine, reviewed Jun , Bardo or Not Bardo greets its audience with death a formality granting access to the real meat of the novel the Bardo, a Tibetan afterlife where Volodine s characters are required, through heavy influence and persistent guidance, to navigate this purgatory of sorts for seven weeks. BARDO OR NOT BARDO by Antoine Volodine , J.T Mahany Bardo, as Laurie Anderson s recent film Heart of a Dog reminds us, is a kind of limbo where the dead await reincarnation for seven weeks, a place where nothing much happens while the soul gathers its wits and chooses its next earthly vehicle. Antoine Volodine s Bardo or Not Bardo Music Literature Apr , Bardo or Not Bardo is a decent place to start reading Volodine, but true satisfaction will come from discovering what these texts have to say in communication with his others, in English, in French, and in a language and realm not yet accessible to mainstream readers. Adapting the Tibetan Book of the Dead On Bardo or not May , Similar to the way that Dante borrows from Catholic cosmology for his Divine Comedy, Antoine Volodine draws on the hierology of Tibetan Buddhism to set the scenes of Bardo or not Bardo, a post exotic black comedy about the deceased who cross through the dark space of the Bardo for seven weeks on their way to reincarnation or enlightenment. Bardo or not Bardo review the beautiful, lonely cycle of life Bardo is, according to Buddhist philosophy, the day period after death and before rebirth, when the soul, if instructed correctly, can avoid rebirth in another form and instead move towards the Bardo In some schools of Buddhism, bardo, antarabh va, or ch u is an intermediate, transitional, or liminal state between death and rebirth It is a concept which arose soon after the Buddha s passing, with a number of earlier Buddhist groups accepting the existence of such an intermediate state, while other schools rejected it In Tibetan Buddhism, bardo is the central theme of the Bardo Thodol, the

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    About " Antoine Volodine J.T. Mahany "

  • Antoine Volodine J.T. Mahany

    Antoine Volodine is the primary pseudonym of a French author Some of his books have been published in sf collections, but his style, which he has called post exoticism , does not fit neatly into any common genre.He publishes under several additional pseudonyms, including Lutz Bassmann and Manuela Draeger.

  • 792 Comments

  • Oh great, yet another novella of linked stories that mixes apocalyptic revolutionary politics and esoteric Tibetan mythology around a witty, Beckettian sense of bemusement at the funny weird violent sexy sweet tragedy of human existence. The gall of this Volodine fellow, to think that there's any kind of stories left to tell about socialist secret agent monks hunting each other through dreamworlds and contemplating the mysteries of a pointless death in an absurd world. Is there anything original [...]


  • (Je demande d'abord pardon aux lecteurs francophones, car cette critique sera en anglais.)To say "this is a book about death" feels trite. Most or at least many books about death focus on the emotional aftermath from the perspective of the survivors. When the deceased's point-of-view is included, it is usually laden with pathos, looking back into the world of the quick to observe the survivors' emotional aftermath and ruminate on things left undone. Closure is usually eventually reached.Not so i [...]


  • Hitherto the word Bardo conjured up either • a museum in Tunisia that suffered a barbaric uncivilised terrorist attack or • an iconic French actress whose name is forever associated with St TropezI had forgotten about that other realm contained within the Tibetan Book of the Dead - in which the deceased have 49 days in limbo before rebirth. This is the strange void where the 7 connected stories in this book take place. There are several things that attracted me to this book1. Its brevity. 16 [...]


  • This guy, this Volodine. It's quite a run, or anyway seems to be from the English-speaker POV. I haven't really dug in to see whether these are being released in anything like the order AV wrote them.This one felt like it might not quite pack the punch. Still good, still funny and strange. But somehow it wasn't quite pushing the same buttons in quite the same perfect way. Then, somewhere around the end of the 4th story, when you started to realize (just like in the middle of We Monks and Soldier [...]


  • Antoine Volodine’s Bardo or Not Bardo (translated by J.T. Mahany) is another book for the “what the fuck did I just read?” files. The summary on makes sense: seven chapters show seven different characters (many of them named Schlumm) fail to achieve enlightenment while traveling through bardo and end up being reincarnated back on earth. I was initially attracted to this book because the review I read said this book was a humorous take on characters struggling in bardo; I was hoping for so [...]


  • My faith in Volodine is restored - after somewhat disappointing "Post-Exoticism in Ten Lessons, Lesson Eleven" (a novel that theorized itself into insubstantiality). "Bardo or not Bardo" is his most impoverished (in a positive - Bersani's - sense), most depopulated and most "Irish" novel: imagine Flann O'Brien and Samuel Beckett collaborating on 7 variations of the final scene(s) from Fulci's THE BEYOND and Tolkin's THE RAPTURE.


  • I'm not going to rate this book because it just wasn't for me. The references to the Tibetan Book of the Dead and the Buddhist funeral practices were interesting, but the stories just seemed absurd and beyond me as far as "getting" them. I read them all, and none of them clicked.


  • as a neophyte in post-exotic volodinia, i'm still finding my bearings (much as those newly arrived in the bardo might do). for the fellow uninitiated, volodine's two-part essay in the new inquiry is essential reading. the pseudonymous/heteronymous french writer has set out for himself the ambitious task of creating an entire literary universe (a la pessoa via oulipo) and the story of said ambition is as compelling as his fiction is intriguing. bardo or not bardo is a tragicomic take on fate, con [...]


  • Few Buddhists would object to any good-hearted challenge to the Dharma. Even as esoteric yet revered a text as the Bardo Thidol, would be expected to hold its own in debate, or, to embrace a challenge. But this book just seems to me to be a thinly-veiled attempt to ridicule an ancient revered text and the practicing Buddhists who carry on the traditions associated with easing passage through the Bardo. It was inventive and funny in spots, especially in the first story, and accurate, again, in sp [...]


  • surreal series of stories set in the Bardo, the waiting room between death and rebirth where Buddhists have the chance to cast off themselves and physical existence, or within 49 days they are reborn to suffer through another lifetimevarious characters pass through the state, as lamas preach to their bodies or artifacts from the Bardo Thodol, in attempt to push them towards that sublimationfascinating concept, but with characters and story lines intermingled and indefinite to the point where it [...]



  • As unclassifiable as Volodine's other work, breathes new life into several genres, including whatever genre the Tibetan book of the dead falls into.


  • This book is a kind of metaphysical game that nearly led me to an existential crisis But in a good way! It's funny, it's weird, it's a joy to read, and it's a challenge to any notion we might have of control, comfort, or concrete understanding of death. It's also impossible to describe without spoilers--though I don't think the concept of spoilers really apply to this book--but, still, beware of spoilers ahead.This set of connected vignettes follows characters in a warped form of the Tibetan Bar [...]


  • A spiritual farce? A human comedy? A satiric view of the absurdity of humans? All of the above? Volodine takes a belief regarding the afterlife and demonstrates that humans, with their foibles, cannot manage to navigate it without total chaos ensuing. The author even takes a stab at the "play within a play" concept. Three vignettes within one vignette. It is a jumbled life, a jumbled afterlife, and a bit of a jumbled read. Very well done!


  • Check out our full list of Summer Reads at worldliteraturetoday/2This book was featured also in the Nota Benes section of the Sept/Oct 2016 issue of World Literature Today Magazineliteraturetoday/2


  • More accurately, 2.5. This was okay, but I was expecting to enjoy it more. There a few funny bits, but it mostly felt absurd and fell kind of flat. I have a feeling that the translation wasn't that great.


  • If you have no taste for Volodine then you will feel that you too are on an interminable journey through some dark bardo realm. Conversely, if you find post-exotic lit oddly compelling, then read this one.



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