Are the Androids Dreaming Yet? Amazing Brain. Human Communication, Creativity and Free Will.

Are the Androids Dreaming Yet Amazing Brain Human Communication Creativity and Free Will Alan Turing invented the computer helped win World War II and left us with one of the greatest puzzles of our time the imitation game Can computers do everything a human mind can do Many scientists t

  • Title: Are the Androids Dreaming Yet? Amazing Brain. Human Communication, Creativity and Free Will.
  • Author: James Tagg
  • ISBN: 9781910464007
  • Page: 227
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Alan Turing invented the computer, helped win World War II and left us with one of the greatest puzzles of our time the imitation game Can computers do everything a human mind can do Many scientists think we have a tenuous hold on the title, most intelligent being on the planet They think it s just a matter of time before computers become smarter than us, and then wAlan Turing invented the computer, helped win World War II and left us with one of the greatest puzzles of our time the imitation game Can computers do everything a human mind can do Many scientists think we have a tenuous hold on the title, most intelligent being on the planet They think it s just a matter of time before computers become smarter than us, and then what This book charts a journey through the science of information, from the origins of language and logic, to the frontiers of modern physics From Lewis Carroll s logic puzzles, through Alan Turing and his work on Enigma, to John Bell s inequality, and finally the Conway Kochen Free Will Theorem How do the laws of physics give us our creativity, our rich experience of communication and, especially, our free will James Tagg is an inventor and entrepreneur A pioneer of touchscreen technology, he has founded several companies, including Truphone, the world s first global mobile network He holds numerous patents, filed in over a hundred countries He studied Physics and Computer Science at Manchester University, Design at Lancaster University and Engineering at Cambridge University He lives with his family on a farm in Kent, England jamestagg

    • Are the Androids Dreaming Yet? Amazing Brain. Human Communication, Creativity and Free Will. : James Tagg
      227 James Tagg
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      Posted by:James Tagg
      Published :2019-08-15T20:33:46+00:00

    About " James Tagg "

  • James Tagg

    I am an inventor and have founded several companies Over the years I have become very interested in what makes us creative and whether computers could acquire this skill.There are lots of spiritual arguments to say humans are not just mechanistic but I wanted to know whether there is a hard scientific difference I think I have found that essential difference in the work I have done and my first book explores this question I studied Physics and Computer Science at Manchester University, Design at Lancaster University and Engineering at Cambridge University I live on a farm in Kent, England.

  • 770 Comments

  • Disclaimer: I received a reader's copy of this book from NetGalley in exchange for my honest review. All opinions expressed are my own, and no monetary compensation was received for this review.(The book was published on Jan, 2015; review written 10/05/2015)I still remember the feeling I’d when I first read Penrose’s “The Emperor’s New Mind” for the first time in 1991. I’d just finished college. I was full of myself. After reading Penrose I came down to earth in a big way. My educati [...]


  • What an intelligent and interesting book! It delves into the question-- Are humans the most intelligent beings on the planet? In fact, we assume as such, so perhaps a better question would be-- will we -always- be? Computers seem to already be on our level.I had my own thoughts and opinions going into this, and images of Wargames and Watson (who happened to be mentioned in the book to my delight!) came to mind. Reading though this book opened my eyes to things I certainly didn't know about progr [...]


  • I enjoyed reading this book. Not being a science graduate I found James' thesis interesting but then found it difficult to evaluate the "science" underpinning his arguments. Also I found the references to further material on the author's website and the challenge of the puzzles a distraction.


  • It would be easy to dismiss this book, with the reference in the title to Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep (the Philip K. Dick book) that Blade Runner was (very loosely) based on, as a vanity project by an entrepreneur who has too much spare time on his hands, but it turns out to be an interesting, if sometimes challenging read.I think that James Tagg's aim was to compare the human brain with what is now and might ever be within the capabilities of an artificial intelligence, and to explore a [...]


  • (Free copy received from NetGalley in exchange for review.)I've always loved robots and the philosophy of robotics. Reading Asimov's I, Robot at an early age probably cinched the love I'd have for these not-quite-human machines and the mystery of their circuitry insides. Therefore, it was a pleasure for me to receive a free copy of Tagg's book, cleverly entitled after Dick's Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? (which, incidentally, served as the basis for one of my favourite movies of all time) [...]


  • I received a copy of this book from a First Reads giveaway. I was really excited to read about the history of computers and androids, and discover the evolution of the android. Tagg’s belief is that in order to understand the future of computers, we must travel far back into humanity’s past to understand philosophy and the birth of modern mathematics. There is a certain strength to Tagg’s writing and it lies in his ability to create examples. As I have no background in philosophy or mathe [...]


  • Alpha minus for effort. Lots of reviewers say the book is too long, and I can see why, because it tries to answer many of the difficult questions there are, and ends up (if you get there) by listing all those questions and more, in a kind of cosmic 'to do list', which will keep James Tagg going for the next three hundred years or so.I don't think it's too long; if anything it's too short, because the only section in which the author's argument is fully expounded is the quantum mechanics section, [...]


  • The first thing to state about this book is, it is. Too. Long. I don't know if it wouldn't feel this long had I been more interested in it, but I don't think so. There was just too many unnecessary pages there.For one thing, the examples. Oh, those examples. While the writer did his best to help us explain the matter, he did so by giving so many examples that there were times I had to go back and check the title of the chapter to remember what I was reading about. That made book a lot harder to [...]


  • I'd like to thank the author for a copy of the book and the chance to review it through the GoodReads First Reads program.~Are the Androids Dreaming Yet? – James Tagg~I was kinda expecting a book about robots and how much they’ve advanced to the point that we are on the verge of being replaced in every aspect of our lives if we aren’t more careful. That’s not what this book is about as a whole. While there were a lot of facts, explanations, and examples, there were still a lot of materia [...]


  • With a background as an inventor and entrepreneur, James Tagg has compiled an extensive collection of discussions on many science-related topics, including computers and artificial intelligence. He writes in a way that is easy to follow for the non-science audience.Every chapter contains gems of information; the visuals enhance the text and help engage the readers. To answer the question, "What Sparks Creativity?", Tagg recommends that "There are many things you can do to unleash your creative p [...]


  • Review of a First Reads selection:This book is a mixed bag. The author's basic goal seems to be to demonstrate that the universe is not deterministic, that free will exists, and that machines have not (yet) achieved true creativity. He does a fine job of this, and I can honestly say that the entire book was a fun series of thought experiments (even the parts that challenged me beyond my capability). However:--The book is too long. There's a lot of material that doesn't seem to be necessary to m [...]


  • This is a comprehensive book about how humans think vs how machines "think" and if it would be possible for machines to ever achieve consciousness. If you like science based books, then you will like this one. Mr. Tagg follows the course of human consciousness and the evolution of machines. I definitely learned a few things. It is also interactive in the sense that there are puzzles throughout for you to solve. The answers are not in the book but in Mr. Tagg's website.I enjoyed this book, but do [...]


  • The author poses a number of questions in his popular science rendition of artificial intelligence, robotics, androids and a philosophical-theological quandary regarding free will. Can we calculate ad infinitum mathematical models to resolve our problem? Is the universe like a clockwork mechanism or are photons mysteriously at work? Are androids capable of creative decision making in the thrust to develop them to imitate human behavior? The book is full of illustrations, historical experiments, [...]


  • Very interesting book. Thank you James for sending me a copy. I won this book through giveaways. It covers many complex concepts from computer development, mathematics and philosophy to examine how the human brain can be compared to computer systems, and the limitations of both. I'll admit, I glazed over a bit when reading the heavy math sections, but there we're enough fun puzzles, historical anecdotes and interesting ideas to keep it moving forward. Cheers!



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