After Redemption: Jim Crow and the Transformation of African American Religion in the Delta, 1875-1915

After Redemption Jim Crow and the Transformation of African American Religion in the Delta After Redemption fills in a missing chapter in the history of African American life after freedom It takes on the widely overlooked period between the end of Reconstruction and World War I to examine

  • Title: After Redemption: Jim Crow and the Transformation of African American Religion in the Delta, 1875-1915
  • Author: John M. Giggie
  • ISBN: 9780195304046
  • Page: 284
  • Format: Paperback
  • After Redemption fills in a missing chapter in the history of African American life after freedom It takes on the widely overlooked period between the end of Reconstruction and World War I to examine the sacred world of ex slaves and their descendants living in the region densely settled than any other by blacks living in this era, the Mississippi and Arkansas Delta.After Redemption fills in a missing chapter in the history of African American life after freedom It takes on the widely overlooked period between the end of Reconstruction and World War I to examine the sacred world of ex slaves and their descendants living in the region densely settled than any other by blacks living in this era, the Mississippi and Arkansas Delta Drawing on a rich range of local memoirs, newspaper accounts, photographs, early blues music, and recently unearthed Works Project Administration records, John Giggie challenges the conventional view that this era marked the low point in the modern evolution of African American religion and culture Set against a backdrop of escalating racial violence in a region densely populated by African Americans than any other at the time, he illuminates how blacks adapted to the defining features of the post Reconstruction South including the growth of segregation, train travel, consumer capitalism, and fraternal orders and in the process dramatically altered their spiritual ideas and institutions Masterfully analyzing these disparate elements, Giggie s study situates the African American experience in the broadest context of southern, religious, and American history and sheds new light on the complexity of black religion and its role in confronting Jim Crow.

    • After Redemption: Jim Crow and the Transformation of African American Religion in the Delta, 1875-1915 : John M. Giggie
      284 John M. Giggie
    • thumbnail Title: After Redemption: Jim Crow and the Transformation of African American Religion in the Delta, 1875-1915 : John M. Giggie
      Posted by:John M. Giggie
      Published :2019-06-13T06:14:42+00:00

    About " John M. Giggie "

  • John M. Giggie

    John M. Giggie Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the After Redemption: Jim Crow and the Transformation of African American Religion in the Delta, 1875-1915 book, this is one of the most wanted John M. Giggie author readers around the world.

  • 930 Comments

  • Far-Reaching Novelty or Assimilation?In After Redemption, John Giggie attempts to “reperiodicize African American religious history after slavery,” which typically relies on two watershed moments at Reconstruction and World War I that are characterized by innovation and bookend a period of stagnation and discouragement (4). Instead, he claims that the post-Reconstruction period can be described as one of “far-reaching novelty in southern black spiritual life,” an era of “intense religi [...]


  • This book has a really interesting title, but I don't feel like it lived up to my expectations. For the first two chapters, it seems that religion is just a side note as Giggie all sorts of other things. Every once in a while he'd throw in a religion reference. It just felt very disconnected and all over the place to me. The last two chapters got better, and religion was much more of a focus; I feel like he could have just kept the last two and called it good.


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