Selfish Whining Monkeys: How we Ended Up Greedy, Narcissistic and Unhappy

Selfish Whining Monkeys How we Ended Up Greedy Narcissistic and Unhappy With a sharp eye for the magnificently absurd Rod Liddle sets light to modern day Britain One of Britain s funniest most daring columnists If he weren t so offensive you d almost call him a national

  • Title: Selfish Whining Monkeys: How we Ended Up Greedy, Narcissistic and Unhappy
  • Author: Rod Liddle
  • ISBN: 9780007351299
  • Page: 251
  • Format: Paperback
  • With a sharp eye for the magnificently absurd, Rod Liddle sets light to modern day Britain One of Britain s funniest, most daring columnists If he weren t so offensive you d almost call him a national treasure Mail on Sunday I, and my generation, seem feckless and irresponsible, endlessly selfish, whining, avaricious, self deluding, self obsessed, spoiled and corrupt anWith a sharp eye for the magnificently absurd, Rod Liddle sets light to modern day Britain One of Britain s funniest, most daring columnists If he weren t so offensive you d almost call him a national treasure Mail on Sunday I, and my generation, seem feckless and irresponsible, endlessly selfish, whining, avaricious, self deluding, self obsessed, spoiled and corrupt and ill What is it that has transformed the British who in living memory were admired for their unassuming, stiff upper lipped capacity for muddling through into the feckless,obese, self deluding, avaricious and self obsessed whingers we have become Savagely funny and relentlessly contrary, yet with a poignant sense of all that we have lost, Rod Liddle mercilessly exposes the absurdity, cant and humbuggery of the way we live now.

    • Selfish Whining Monkeys: How we Ended Up Greedy, Narcissistic and Unhappy By Rod Liddle
      251 Rod Liddle
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      Posted by:Rod Liddle
      Published :2019-06-08T11:49:54+00:00

    About " Rod Liddle "

  • Rod Liddle

    Rod Liddle Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Selfish Whining Monkeys: How we Ended Up Greedy, Narcissistic and Unhappy book, this is one of the most wanted Rod Liddle author readers around the world.

  • 187 Comments

  • The most enjoyable read I've had for some time. Liddle seems like a no-nonsense type who makes plenty of valid comments throughout.


  • Every book I’ve read recently seems to say the same thing. Nobody can stand life and they're all so desperate they’ll cling to anything that gives them some sense of meaning. Liddle says this is because of two ideologies which have taken hold of the population - one from the left and one from the right. From the left we have the liberalisation of social rules, many of which have been good, such as the end of sexism and racism. From the right we have Chicago school economics which advocates f [...]


  • Brilliantly expounded, probably as what he wrote resounded so clearly with my own views- I am of a similar generation and from a similar background so not surprising. Different country too so I don't think his analysis relates just to the UK. Only drawback is that he keeps apologising or making allowances before he says something "controversial" which tends to dilute the message and makes it at times too wordy. He didn't need to do that as the reader makes allowances for this when reading. I alw [...]


  • The subtitle of this book is how we ended up greedy, narcissistic and unhappy. It doesn’t sound cheerful reading! But it is absolutely brilliant. Liddle is a superb writer – humorous, observant, and biting. He does not write from a Christian perspective but there is much in here that I could resonate with. One warning – one of the weak points about the book is the regular use of the ‘F word’….There were so many quotes that I have written up a fuller review on my blog with extensive q [...]


  • Funny and profane at times. He uses the "F" word a lot. A touching backdrop to this book is the story of his parents, whom you sense he admires and wishes he could emulate. The loss of the British national character and its descent into a nervy, emotionally incontinent, sentimentalist, let-it-all-hang-out, disposition is indeed worthy of critique. Theodore Dalrymple does a more eloquent criticism of this theme; but Liddle's book is also a worthy contribution to this.


  • A little more substance than, say, a rant by Jeremy Clarkson or Richard Littlejohn, but not by much. Mildly entertaining and mildly though provoking. Heartening to know that there are at least some people left who don't live in terror of the PC Thought Police.


  • Rod Liddle is a unusually entertaining writer who enjoys using incendiary language. (He says he has an animus against those who seek to control words. I tend to sympathize.) The underlying message, however, is serious and thoughtful; how did we become the way he believes we are - i.e silly, self-important and emotionally incontinent? Liddle partly blames post-war governments, from both the Left and the Right, and argues that it is the people at the bottom of the pile who have suffered most from [...]


  • I read this book in a week after having picked it up on the "exchange table" of my office. When you are done with a book you can just drop it on this table and pick something else - or just pick a book that attracts your attention.This book attracted my attention because of the title. I thought it just expressed my feelings. I am not British, nor I follow British life closely, so I had no idea that Rod Liddle is a "public" personality with a reputation. I found it out afterwards and I am glad I [...]


  • Definitely a book that's passed through political correctness and come out the other side.There seem to be a couple of issues drawing Rod Liddle's ire. The first is the narcissism of modern society, which he skewers mercilessly. The second is the emergence of a super-class of highly advantaged upper-middle-class families who are radically better able to access society's goods than others. Their advantages come from multiple sources – public schooling, living in better areas, social networks th [...]


  • I enjoy Rod Liddle as a columnist, never missing his contributions to the Sunday Times or the Spectator. I have always viewed him as a bit of a shock-jock journalist. Some insight, but far more venom and the ability to make me laugh. I was rather surprised by this book. The trademark elements are there, but this is a deeper, more thoughtful book than I expected. In contrasting his parents' attitudes and life experiences with that of his (my) generations' he gives an interesting and persuasive gu [...]


  • Whilst quite interesting in places and making some interesting and broad comments on the progress of society in the UK. On the other hand (while the book was very much caveated as a long whiny anecdote) I did feel that the trips down Rod's memory lane and hard done by attitude was a bit too much. Better to read some social science if you want social commentary and a Bio if you want memories. This fell a bit in between and I wasn't sure what to do with it


  • Probably has greatest appeal to over 50s men that have suffered near death experiences and want to put the world to rights.For those that think that something is missing from society, this book is for you, but don't read it expecting to find any solutions.


  • MisanthropicI like Liddle, I agree with him quite a lot. I like his columns in the various publications he writes for. I don't think there's much direction in this book, but it doesn't particularly suffer for it. If you like him, read it, if you don't, don't.


  • Some bits I loved and could identify with, being a similar age but other bits had a feel of the 'grumpy old man'. still an enjoyable read.


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