I Moved Your Cheese: For Those Who Refuse to Live as Mice in Someone Else's Maze

I Moved Your Cheese For Those Who Refuse to Live as Mice in Someone Else s Maze Who Moved My Cheese the biggest selling business book of all time with over million copies in print has some decent advice about adapting to change but it also teaches us to passively accept the w

  • Title: I Moved Your Cheese: For Those Who Refuse to Live as Mice in Someone Else's Maze
  • Author: Deepak Malhotra
  • ISBN: 9781609940669
  • Page: 358
  • Format: ebook
  • Who Moved My Cheese the biggest selling business book of all time with over 25 million copies in print has some decent advice about adapting to change, but it also teaches us to passively accept the world as is Through a new fable with new characters Harvard Business School professor and bestselling author Negotiation Genius, 50,000 copies sold , Deepak Malhotra dirWho Moved My Cheese the biggest selling business book of all time with over 25 million copies in print has some decent advice about adapting to change, but it also teaches us to passively accept the world as is Through a new fable with new characters Harvard Business School professor and bestselling author Negotiation Genius, 50,000 copies sold , Deepak Malhotra directly challenges that message He encourages people never to stop asking questions, to examine their assumptions and to control their own destiny rather than chasing blindly after it.

    • I Moved Your Cheese: For Those Who Refuse to Live as Mice in Someone Else's Maze By Deepak Malhotra
      358 Deepak Malhotra
    • thumbnail Title: I Moved Your Cheese: For Those Who Refuse to Live as Mice in Someone Else's Maze By Deepak Malhotra
      Posted by:Deepak Malhotra
      Published :2019-07-04T03:39:40+00:00

    About " Deepak Malhotra "

  • Deepak Malhotra

    Deepak Malhotra is a Professor in the Negotiation, Organizations and Markets Unit at the Harvard Business School He teaches courses on negotiation strategy to MBA students, as well as in a variety of executive programs, including the Owner President Management Program, Changing the Game and Families in Business.Deepak s research focuses on negotiation strategy, trust development, competitive escalation, and international and ethnic dispute resolution, and has been published in top journals in the fields of management, psychology, conflict resolution and foreign policy His work has also received considerable media attention, including multiple appearances by Deepak on CNBC Deepak has won awards for both his teaching and his research.Deepak s professional activities include training, consulting, and advisory work for firms across the globe in dozens of industries He is also a frequently invited speaker to executive groups such as the Young Presidents Organization YPO , the Entrepreneurs Organization EO and The Executive Club TEC.

  • 575 Comments

  • If I hear the words "cheese", "mice", or "maze" one more time I'm going to scream. This is not a bad book. The author is using this rat maze concept as a business metaphor and I definitely could connect the dots and see where he was going with it. The repetition of these keywords quickly became extremely annoying to me though. It's possible this experience is exclusive to meybe my mood or my response to the audiobook narrator, or who knows. I just had to move on.


  • الكتاب مثله مثل كتابلا أريد المزيد من الجبن أريد فقط الخروج من المصيدةجاء للرد على كتابمن الذي حرك قطعة الجبن الخاصة بي ؟اعتقد انك يجب ان تقرا الثلاث كتب ب الترتيب الاتى: من الذي حرك قطعة الجبن الخاصة بي ؟ أنا حركت قطعة الجبن الخاصة بكلا أريد المزيد من الجبن أريد فقط الخروج من [...]


  • This is a very quick read, and an interesting perspective.This book is a rebuttal (perhaps too strong a word) to the wildly popular "Who Moved My Cheese". That book's premise was - when things around you change, you must accept the change or you won't survive. There wasn't really a question of "who" in that book, or why. I Moved Your Cheese is about understanding who, what, why, and then responding to the change. Much more of a focus on thinking and not blindly accepting what is happening around [...]


  • "What I wish is not that you pursue happiness, but that you actually find happiness. Is it possible to pursue happiness, if the pursuit itself does not actually make you happy?"


  • Clearly better than the one it responds to (Who Moved My Cheese?), which was way too simplistic.“What I wish is not that you pursue happiness, but that you actually find happiness. Is it possible to pursue happiness if the pursuit itself does not make you happy?”


  • I think the message Mr. Malhotra conveys in this very quick read is a good message about not losing what it means to be an individual. Be curious, be adventurous, pursue happiness, don't accept something just because you're told to etc. I can easily see the connections he's making between the obvious corporate world (the maze) and the workers (mice) that navigate it. I felt like it was too simplified and to some extent I am horrified that it makes so many people out there sound like they are cor [...]


  • هذا هو الكتاب المُضاد وليس المُكمّل لكتاب جونسون"من حرّك قطعة الجبن الخاصة بي؟" وتطرّق للحقيقة والفكرة الرئيسة لكتاب جونسون:أنّ التغيير يحدث؛ بغض النظر عن المكوث دون حراكوالشكوى من التغييرأو أن تتغيّر مع الوقت، فلا تخشَ التغيير بل تقبله.فحكمة ذاك الكتاب تنص على أنّ التغيير [...]


  • How many of us have read the book, “Who Moved My cheese ?” ? Almost everyone, isn’t it ? It is hard to find a corporate employee who has not read this book, isn’t it ? Published in 1998, Dr. Spencer Johnson’s Who Moved My Cheese? An Amazing Way to Deal with Change in Your Work and in Your Life has sold more than 26 million copies continues to be one of the best-selling business books ever. This 96 page book that involves the mice “Sniff & Scurry” and the little people “Hem &a [...]


  • Any time this book is mentioned it's a debate over whether it refutes Who Moved My Cheese? or adding to it. To me it depends on how one interprets what the maze represents. Is it a metaphor for the world at large or does it represent limits places upon us?In I Moved Your Cheese, the moral of the story is that we can breakthrough limits that have been set upon us. Our mind is the most powerful thing we possess. The six inches between our ears dictates where our life goes. The insistence of our mi [...]


  • From my LinkedIn Book List/Review: "What a great little book. Highly recommend this. One theme is (& there are really many): Think for yourself, and be true to what you believe. Doors will open (or, in this case: wall will come down)AD IT!"


  • Brief allegorical book that encourages questioning assumptions and not accepting the limitations that others might impose on you.


  • A response to the original book, "Who Moved My Cheese," which explores and empowers the individual to think (and perhaps also operate) outside the Maze. No discussion around how to proactively and successfully execute on Change Management.Quotations:having more cheese does not make us happier—only getting more cheese matters to us. You are asking mice to do things they have never learned. You are asking them to question and to think, but they choose to accept things as given. You are asking th [...]


  • I really liked the main message of the book. It addresses many important problems about society and social statuses and norms. "We should seek to understand why the change has been forced on us, how we might exert greater control over our lives in the future, whether the goals we are chasing are the correct ones, and what it would take to escape the kinds of mazes in which we are always subject to the designs of others." This is very true when we apply this to our lives. However, one thing bothe [...]


  • Please forgive the inanity of this review. I just read a book about mice.Let me be clear: this book was basically an extended metaphor about mice in mazes. Maybe I am missing some key idea because I never read the book that inspired this one "Who Moved My Cheese?", and I am not part of the corporate world (the audience for whom I assume this is primarily written), but I did not enjoy this. Although it would probably feel patronizing, I couldn't help but want more about how to apply this in the r [...]



  • Deepak Malhotra wrote a nice little story around the Who Moved My Cheese? book by Spencer Johnson. Here you will get another point of view on the subject of change: If change happens anyway, then why care so much about the reason for the change? Should we not care more about the change in itself and how we handle it? Some parts are zen-like, for example: “It’s not so much the mouse in the maze that is the problem. The problem is the maze in the mouse”. That self-inflicted cage we put our t [...]


  • This is a nice little story. There's no need to buy the book; it has really big font, so it only took about 45 minutes to read in the book store.It's a great story to start discussion. I was hoping the book would have more substance and perhaps examine the implications. It leaves the thinking to the reader, which might not be a bad thing considering the simplicity of the story. But you'd think that a Harvard professor would provide some profound insights that might escape us commoners. My socks [...]


  • I bought this book when it went on amazon's daily deal for $0.99. It was a short book so I'm glad I didn't pay more than a dollar. However, the book had some really interesting thoughts. What I got from it was this: Although we need to accept that life changes to be happy, we should ask why things change.I think this is important. I think people just stop asking questions and remain unsatisfied.


  • Make Changes, Don't Just Blindly Accept ThemThis is a much better allegorical view of change. The author relies heavily readers knowledge of the book "Who Moved My Cheese" and therefore to the uninitiated it might not be as validating as it was for me. It certainly took the moldy cheese taste out of my mouth!The bottom line is that handling change like the characters in this book is a much better approach than those in "Who Moved My Cheese".


  • It had potential as a story, but that potential was not explored correctly. Despite the author has a good argument to why we should not accept the change without asking why, many times this book does not go straight to the point, which turns it into a bit boring book, when compared with the WMMC book.


  • change happens. You can sit there and complain about it , or you can change with the times . Do not fear change . Accept change . What happens in the maze is beyond your control . What you can control is your reaction . - Deepak Malhotra .


  • Finally someone willing to say that the entire Who Moved My Cheese phenomenon is bunk. As the author states in the preface, "Perhaps we should stopy telling people that they are simply mice, chasing cheese, in someone else's maze."




  • As most people who are familiar with my taste in books know, I seldom read non-fiction books and rarely venture into self-help books. To me, reading is mostly a recreational pursuit and few books in these more serious genres are able to sustain my interest long enough before I am inevitably distracted (sorry book snobs hehe, my books are usually more of an escape). However, in order to ensure that I do not remain a total ignoramus, I do wade into these waters on occasion. This book was pleasantl [...]


  • بنظر الكاتب فهذا الكتاب مجرد تكملة للكتاب من حرك قطعة الجبن الخاصة بي لسبنسر جونسون ،من الامور الي عجبتني والكتاب حاول يوصلها هي التفكير خارج الاطار المألوف والنمطية المتبعة من قبل الجميع Think outside the box "اتعرف ياماكس ، المشكلة ليست في وجود الفأر داخل المتاهة بل في وجود المتاهة [...]


  • For anyone who has read "Who Moved My Cheese?" and felt uncomfortable with the book's premise that change happens so we just need to adapt and deal with it. Crying over moved cheese gets us nowhere. Such advice is useful but it also seems to be an incomplete view of the world. To just say that change happens and that we all need to merely scurry around to adapt sounds stressful and de-humanizing. We need to acknowledge that we have the ability to say the hell with this maze and these rules, I'm [...]


  • Well orchestrated but reasoning for escaping maze is simply not realizing its irrelevant but there should be a valid reason why someone would need to think to escape if that can be illustrated will be great experience in life is mazes are concentric come out of one maze then you are in a new bigger maze which contained the one you just escaped any solutions?


  • Originally written as a retort to the motivational book “Who Moved My Cheese”. I found it interesting and some what humorous. As I have not read the book “Who Moved My Cheese” in my case I don't want to be a mouse in a maze but if it motivates people it can't be badI'm retired and done worrying about cheese period.


  • If the changes happenyou can sit there and complain about itOr u can change with the timesDon't fear changes but accept changesWhat you can control is called reaction and what you cannot control just copy with it or ignore it and let your life goal is the "happeness" Habits are hard to break,,but to move out from the maz is by how to break your old habits and act creative,,


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