Is Sex Necessary? or Why You Feel the Way You Do

Is Sex Necessary or Why You Feel the Way You Do The first book of prose published by either James Thurber or E B White Is Sex Necessary combines the humor and genius of both authors to examine those great mysteries of life romance love and marri

  • Title: Is Sex Necessary? or Why You Feel the Way You Do
  • Author: James Thurber E.B. White John Updike
  • ISBN: 9780060733148
  • Page: 292
  • Format: Paperback
  • The first book of prose published by either James Thurber or E B White, Is Sex Necessary combines the humor and genius of both authors to examine those great mysteries of life romance, love, and marriage A masterpiece of drollery, this 75th Anniversary Edition stands the test of time with its sidesplitting spoof of men, women, and psychologists than fifty funnThe first book of prose published by either James Thurber or E B White, Is Sex Necessary combines the humor and genius of both authors to examine those great mysteries of life romance, love, and marriage A masterpiece of drollery, this 75th Anniversary Edition stands the test of time with its sidesplitting spoof of men, women, and psychologists than fifty funny illustrations by Thurber and a new foreword by John Updike.

    • Is Sex Necessary? or Why You Feel the Way You Do By James Thurber E.B. White John Updike
      292 James Thurber E.B. White John Updike
    • thumbnail Title: Is Sex Necessary? or Why You Feel the Way You Do By James Thurber E.B. White John Updike
      Posted by:James Thurber E.B. White John Updike
      Published :2019-02-19T03:41:55+00:00

    About " James Thurber E.B. White John Updike "

  • James Thurber E.B. White John Updike

    Thurber was born in Columbus, Ohio to Charles L Thurber and Mary Agnes Mame Fisher Thurber Both of his parents greatly influenced his work His father, a sporadically employed clerk and minor politician who dreamed of being a lawyer or an actor, is said to have been the inspiration for the small, timid protagonist typical of many of his stories Thurber described his mother as a born comedienne and one of the finest comic talents I think I have ever known She was a practical joker, on one occasion pretending to be crippled and attending a faith healer revival, only to jump up and proclaim herself healed.Thurber had two brothers, William and Robert Once, while playing a game of William Tell, his brother William shot James in the eye with an arrow Because of the lack of medical technology, Thurber lost his eye This injury would later cause him to be almost entirely blind During his childhood he was unable to participate in sports and activities because of his injury, and instead developed a creative imagination, which he shared in his writings.From 1913 to 1918, Thurber attended The Ohio State University, where he was a member of the Phi Kappa Psi Fraternity He never graduated from the University because his poor eyesight prevented him from taking a mandatory ROTC course In 1995 he was posthumously awarded a degree.From 1918 to 1920, at the close of World War I, Thurber worked as a code clerk for the Department of State, first in Washington, D.C and then at the American Embassy in Paris, France After this Thurber returned to Columbus, where he began his writing career as a reporter for the Columbus Dispatch from 1921 to 1924 During part of this time, he reviewed current books, films, and plays in a weekly column called Credos and Curios, a title that later would be given to a posthumous collection of his work Thurber also returned to Paris in this period, where he wrote for the Chicago Tribune and other newspapers.In 1925, he moved to Greenwich Village in New York City, getting a job as a reporter for the New York Evening Post He joined the staff of The New Yorker in 1927 as an editor with the help of his friend and fellow New Yorker contributor, E.B White His career as a cartoonist began in 1930 when White found some of Thurber s drawings in a trash can and submitted them for publication Thurber would contribute both his writings and his drawings to The New Yorker until the 1950s.Thurber was married twice In 1922, Thurber married Althea Adams The marriage was troubled and ended in divorce in May 1935 Adams gave Thurber his only child, his daughter Rosemary Thurber remarried in June, 1935 to Helen Wismer His second marriage lasted until he died in 1961, at the age of 66, due to complications from pneumonia, which followed upon a stroke suffered at his home His last words, aside from the repeated word God, were God bless God damn, according to Helen Thurber.

  • 277 Comments

  • This book is hilarious. A satire on the state of sexuality in this country, but also eerily accurate. Likewise, the stick figure, minimalist drawings (sketches, really) garnered many laughs from me, for being downright silly but also made a lot of sense. While reading this book, there were numerous "I know exactly how that feels" and "How did they explain that conundrum/emotion/relationship/situation so well?" moments. I relished each of the ingenious "case histories", humorous examples of the s [...]


  • Hilarious. Absolutely hilarious. If you're a fan of Monty Python, Jerry Seinfeld, the Marx Brothers, Jonathan Swift or Steve Martin, I highly recommend this book. This book was written by E.B. White and James Thurber in 1929, and I will never, never look at the author of Charlotte's Web the same way again. It is still remarkably topical; while some of the phrasing is dated, the dry satirical wit is priceless.Some passages (although the humor has less punch when taken out of context):Chapter 2: H [...]


  • “An imagined kiss is more easily controlled, more thoroughly enjoyed, and less cluttery than an actual kiss.”Although I hope I am far from believing above statement to be true (yet), this book was a joy to read. There are several layers of fun in it—primary is the ironic distortion of the psychology pseudo-sci self-help books of the late 20s (I've never read any of them, though I can imagine what can come out of naïve or mistaken reading of Freud) implicitly including gorgeous jokes on th [...]


  • A pre-kinsey sex book. Parody or not, it's one of the most terribly dated books i've ever read. When they discuss "sex" by mentioning things like "where the guest towels are kept" and "leaving muddy footprints on the floor", it's clear that the authors are actually talking about the domestic aspects of relationships between men and women and absolutely not talking about "sexual intercourse". So the book was kind of odd and confusing a lot of the time when it said it was talking about "sex" but a [...]


  • Well, this is a mildly entertaining if very dated parody of the scientific (or "scientific," perhaps)approach to understanding human sexuality that began to emerge in the early twentieth century. White and Thurber evidently thought folk like Freud and co. were generally a pretty silly bunch, and I can't entirely disagree with that assessment, in all honesty. However, this book doesn't really do a lot to explode them, so much as it offers a series of loosely-linked and mildly amusing but still ul [...]


  • I borrowed this one from a friend after seeing it on his shelf and immediately being intrigued by E.B. White's name on the cover. I mean, it was a little unexpected to see the creator of Charlotte's Web and Stuart Little included in a book about sex.A brilliant spoof of the multitude of professional sex study books that were released at the time (and are really still being published today), Thurber and White turn all the clinical talk into hilarity by discussing relations between men and women i [...]


  • As a final word on sex, this book fails. I’m glad I didn’t read this when I was young – it might have put me on the wrong track for years. As it was, I had to compile my perception of sex from tattered fantasy novels and lurid novellas accidentally classified in the young adult section of my local library. The discovery, when I was twelve, of a suitcase stuffed with the most hardcore pornography imaginable - buried, like some hideous treasure, in the damp leaves of the woods - well, that d [...]


  • James Thurber and EB White are very funny people, and that's pretty much all you really need to know to pick up this book. Writing in 1929, this is their send-up of every single pop-psychology book about love, sex and relationships, and they frankly do a fantastic job of it. The basic argument behind the whole book is that sex is silly and love is ridiculous, so perhaps it's time to stop worrying so much and just go out and enjoy them both. An excellent lesson, if there ever was one.


  • An often hilarious piece of drollery that can ultimately lead to depression if you haven't gotten laid in awhile. In between fits of laughter, you start to realize that both you and the authors aggree that, not only is sex absolutely necessary, it should be our primary and paramount concern in life.I would advise not to read this book in a cold bed.


  • What a team! The reader gets what the reader expects from the two great humorists: James Thurber and E. B. White. I laughed until I was in pain. Is Sex Necessary was first written in l929, renewed at least seven times. One hundred years from now I suspect another renewal, and its humor and revelance will still apply. Have fun!


  • A few favorite excerpts:“I think we somehow managed, simultaneously, to arrive at the conclusion that the heavy writers had got sex down and were breaking its arm.” (White, pg. 4)“The problem in this case was to make sex seem more complex and dangerous. This task was taken up by sociologists, analysts, gynecologists, psychologists, and authors; they approached it with a great deal of scientific knowledge and an immense zeal. They joined forces and made the whole matter of sex complicated [...]


  • E. B. White's essays, children's books, and Elements of Style writing tips are justifiably classics, but I can't say the same for his first book, Is Sex Necessary?. Hastily written in collaboration with his friend and colleague James Thurber (they wrote alternating chapters), fitted out with Thurber's rough cartoons, and published around the time of the stock market crash in 1929, it's dated in the way that only a humor book from 85 years ago can be. Thurber and White were evidently parodying th [...]


  • I've often thought about going back in time and examining what my personal relationships could have been with my most favorite authors. I likely would have dated Ernest Hemingway. We would have had some grand cataclysmic relationship, matched only by a butting of egos. I could have easily been one of those whiskey-drinking, gun-shooting, brazen women, with whom Hem courted but chose to portray in his writing as weak-willed, patronizing and subservient as means to jab and uppercut the significanc [...]


  • Written in 1929 by EB White and James Thurber while both were working at The New Yorker, it's still lol funny, current, and sharp on the thousands of moments of humiliation and bewilderment in relationships. Written from the male perspective, it's not about sex but its "pathologisation" by psychologists like Freud and others writing in popular journals offering advice that befuddle rather than help. Thurber wrote movingly on the claustrophobia felt by men in marriage - while girls/women are comp [...]


  • Not quite as funny as some of Thurber's later stuff, but there were still a lot of fun bits.P. 104 -- "When she arrived in New York and secured her unfurnished apartment (usually in West Fourth Street), her mental elation was so great and her activity in making parchment lamp shades so unabating that for the first couple of weeks she let sex go. Women are notoriously apt to get off the track; no man was ever diverted from the gratification of his desires by a parchment lamp shade."P. 113 -- "You [...]


  • The reason I picked this book at a Clunes thrift store was because my mind couldn't put E. B. White of beloved children's favourite Charlotte's Web and sex together! Ha! However, this 1929 work isn't about sex. Well it is, sort of, but not in *that* way [read: no naughty bits!]. It is an extremely funny take on men, women, courtship rituals, expectations, and realities set against the American sensibilities of the 20s. A humorous social commentary of sorts, if you will. Although entirely tongue- [...]


  • Yes, it’s the same author who did Charlotte’s Web. However, I was expecting something completely different from this book. It turns out that this book is a parody.Imagine 1929. In the field of sexuality, Freud was the man. Ellis was gaining a reputation, and Kinsey is about to begin his sexual experiments. Many people don’t think of the 1920’s as a sexual time in history. But I guess people were eventually getting out of their Victorian slumbers.At any rate, Freud and others made sexuali [...]


  • James Thurber is one of my favorite authors, and I rank him in my top three humorous writers. This is an early (1929) book in the careers of both James Thurber and E.B. White written shortly after they joined the New Yorker staff.If you're looking for sex in this book you are not going to find it. At the time of the writing of this book, when sex was psychologically discovered and prominently written about, White and Thurber decided to do a spoof on these psychological publications. Is Sex Neces [...]


  • Originally published in 1929 and written by two famous children's books' authors before they were famous children's books' authors, this is a spoof of the then newfangled do-it-yourself psychology books, psychoanalysis in general, and the professional sex education movement. It doesn't actually talk about sex. It's completely tame and dances all around the subject, focusing instead on sex substitutes, types of females, misunderstandings of lilies and bluebirds, the foibles of frigid males with r [...]


  • Originally published in 1929 and written by two famous children's books' authors before they were famous children's books' authors, this is a spoof of the then newfangled do-it-yourself psychology books, psychoanalysis in general, and the professional sex education movement. It doesn't actually talk about sex. It's completely tame and dances all around the subject, focusing instead on sex substitutes, types of females, misunderstandings of lilies and bluebirds, the foibles of frigid males with r [...]


  • Flat-out hilarious, full of ironic wisdom and in some ways strikingly prescient. "By and large, love is easier to experience before it has been explained - easier and cleaner." And, "there are many kinds of love I shall confine my discussion to the usual hazy interpretation: the strange bewilderment which overtakes one person on account of another." Regrettably, the humour loses some of its punch after the first couple of chapters. Other than the obvious cultural references, and the fact that no [...]


  • "There wasn't one woman in ten thousand, riding frontwards on the rear seat of a tandem wheel, who would permit her consort to ride backwards on the front seat. The result of all this was not adjustment, but irritability. Man became frustrated.""Understanding the principles of passion is like knowing how to drive a car; once mastered, all is smoothed out; no more does one experience the feeling of perilous adventure, the misgivings, the diverting little hesitancies, the wrong turns, the false st [...]


  • There are times when it shows its age; language used and assumption of traditional gender norms. That being said there are clever sections in this collection of essays that take on the guise of being a study of sex and relationships. Psychology and those who write on sex are a frequently lampooned in references to others' work in the subject, but that particular kind of joke sadly stops short of elaborating. There are some passages I could better relate to--particularly the frigidity of males , [...]


  • "An imagined kiss is more easily controlled, more thoroughly enjoyed, and less cluttery than an actual kiss. To kiss in dream is wholly pleasant. First, the woman is one of your selection, not just anyone who happens to be in your arms at the moment. Second, the deed is garnished with a little spring of glamour which the mind, in exquisite taste, contributes. Third, the lips, imaginatively, are placed just so, the right hand is placed just so, the concurrent thoughts arrive, just so." -E.B. Whit [...]


  • A somewhat amusing satire making light of Freudian and other psudeo-scientific "research" on the relationships between men and women. The sex of the title refers more to marriage and love than sexual intercourse. The chapter on children explaining sex and childbirth to their oblivious parents (who have only managed to have children by accident), was probably the funniest chapter. Otherwise, the book wasn't quite sharp or scathing enough to overcome its dating; it becomes really clear that the st [...]


  • Many reviewers may not have gotten the joke. And the joke is somewhat hidden given that this was written in 1929 as a parody of the many sex and relationship manuals of the 1920s. I found the whole thing wryly amusing when I first read it in my early 20s, but now, after more experience in the field, absolutely dead-on. Women take note: Thurber was an unapologetic misogynist and horribly "hen-pecked" husband whose humor will no doubt seem dated and sexist. That said, I heartily recommend the book [...]


  • The book was written as a spoof on sex and the study of sex that went on at the turn of the century. Classic for the time, all ails and ridiculous behaviors by men are laid at the feet of women (those not too bright companions that should stick to their knitting and leave their man total and complete access to freedom). If anything, it's insulting. I read it at the behest of a close male friend that thought it was hysterical, which only made me wonder how far we have truly advanced in the exposu [...]


  • IMPORTANT NOTE: This is not the version I read. I have a copy of the original 1929 version and read it. This goofy book from 1929 by a couple of humorous writers is full of amusing comments and drawings about relationships between men and women. Chapters on how to tell Love from Passion, how children should tell their parents about sex, (which has mention of the “generation gap”). The chapter on the Frigidity in Men is also very amusing. Somewhat dated but interesting historically and social [...]


  • Given the fact that this book was written in the late 20's, it's genius. Thurber and White poke fun at pop psychology, which I think is at the root of a lot of imaginary ailments AD/HD, autism, fibromyalgia, etc. Anyways, the do so with great flair, and I think it's a pretty good reading supplement for those who are, or about to, be married. In fact, even if you're single, you should probably read it, because it's a hoot.


  • This was not originally in Dad's Thurber collection--or maybe it had been kept in his room. In any case, when it appeared on the shelf in the living room I'd already read a bunch of Thurber and was immediately interested. The title, however, made me self-conscious about this enthusiasm. I was obsessed with and rather ignorant about sex. Consequently, I read the thing after my parents were in bed and was disappointed. It wasn't sexy at all and much of the humor was beyond my ken.


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