Visions of the Daughters of Albion

Visions of the Daughters of Albion This landmark edition of William Blake s Visions of the Daughters of Albion provides the first full size reproduction of the Huntington Library s copy of the work printed and colored by Blake and his

  • Title: Visions of the Daughters of Albion
  • Author: William Blake
  • ISBN: 9780873281874
  • Page: 170
  • Format: Hardcover
  • This landmark edition of William Blake s Visions of the Daughters of Albion provides the first full size reproduction of the Huntington Library s copy of the work, printed and colored by Blake and his wife, Catherine, in 1793 Generally seen as a continuation of The Book of Thel, this relatively early work of Blake s offers a criticism of the sexual morals of his time, preThis landmark edition of William Blake s Visions of the Daughters of Albion provides the first full size reproduction of the Huntington Library s copy of the work, printed and colored by Blake and his wife, Catherine, in 1793 Generally seen as a continuation of The Book of Thel, this relatively early work of Blake s offers a criticism of the sexual morals of his time, presenting its author s views on the evils of organized religion, on slavery, and on oppressed womanhood Drawings related to Visions that Blake sketched in his Notebook, now held in the British Library, have been digitally enhanced in the reproductions in this edition and are visible for the first time.Blake expert Robert Essick explains not just the text but also Blake s invention of the method he used to etch his poetry and designs A plate by plate analysis of the images and text sets the enigmas of Blake s poetry in the clarifying contexts of his life and thought and of contemporary literature and politics.

    • Visions of the Daughters of Albion : William Blake
      170 William Blake
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      Posted by:William Blake
      Published :2019-05-05T09:00:00+00:00

    About " William Blake "

  • William Blake

    William Blake was an English poet, painter, and printmaker Largely unrecognised during his lifetime, Blake s work is today considered seminal and significant in the history of both poetry and the visual arts.Blake s prophetic poetry has been said to form what is in proportion to its merits the least read body of poetry in the language His visual artistry has led one modern critic to proclaim him far and away the greatest artist Britain has ever produced Although he only once travelled any further than a day s walk outside London over the course of his life, his creative vision engendered a diverse and symbolically rich corpus, which embraced imagination as the body of God , or Human existence itself.Once considered mad for his idiosyncratic views, Blake is highly regarded today for his expressiveness and creativity, and the philosophical and mystical currents that underlie his work His work has been characterized as part of the Romantic movement, or even Pre Romantic , for its largely having appeared in the 18th century Reverent of the Bible but hostile to the established Church, Blake was influenced by the ideals and ambitions of the French and American revolutions, as well as by such thinkers as Emanuel Swedenborg.Despite these known influences, the originality and singularity of Blake s work make it difficult to classify One 19th century scholar characterised Blake as a glorious luminary , a man not forestalled by predecessors, nor to be classed with contemporaries, nor to be replaced by known or readily surmisable successors.

  • 605 Comments

  • This is one of my favorite long poems. I've read it many times. However, on this reading, I began to question my previous ideas about the main character, Oothoon. I've always found her to be incredibly strong in horrible circumstances. Yet, on this reading, I found her more than strong: I found her powerful. Someone who questions the status quo, the norms of the day. She doesn't just question, she defiantly speaks out loud her thoughts without backing down. An excellent read! worth revisiting ma [...]


  • Can you tell I'm in a Romanticism class? Well, I think Blake is an INFJ. He has to be. He's got such revolutionary thoughts, and thoughts that have to do with social causes (no matter how heretic-like). Also, he's a genius. He's influenced so much post-mortum. This story can even be applied now with the question of rape culture and victim blaming and slut shaming. Blake was so ahead of his time. I wish I met him.


  • Tis a condemnation of slavery 'n' female oppression. Love his paintings. Exhibitions make me frantically kleptomaniacal. *craves*



  • I had not heard of this volume as much, but it so heartbreaking. It deals with the rape of a spirit and she is bound to the back of her rapist. The rest of the poem is a series of lamentation from the spirit, the rapist, and the lover who watches his beloved's torment but does nothing. Heart-rending and an examination of how sex can be seen as impurity, but how that is projected onto rather than it being inherent to the act itself.


  • Damn it, great work! Not only metaphysically profound (specially when read in the light of mystic Böhme's work), but also politically and psychologically deep. I cry, Love! Love! Love! happy happy Love! free as the mountain wind!Can that be Love, that drinks another as a sponge drinks water?That clouds with jealousy his nights, with weepings all the day:To spin a web of age around him, grey and hoary! dark!Till his eyes sicken at the fruit that hangs before his sight.Such is self-love that envi [...]





  • I don't understand the poem or the accompanying paintings, but I love how William Blake challenges me. And I feel that the beauty of this work is inescapable.


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